Merri Creek Sewer Relief Project uses kwik-ZIP spacers

The project involved the rehabilitation of a 100-year-old brick sewer running along Merri Creek, through Coburg, Brunswick and Northcote in Melbourne.

Works involved the installation of DN 225 PVC screw pipe inside of eight separate 380 mm outside diameter bore holes totalling 346 m.

L&D Micro Tunnelling – completing the microtunnelling works on behalf of Land Engineering, Quinn Civil, and JHL Civil for Melbourne Water and CPB Contractors – used kwik-ZIP HD 50 spacers to protect and centralise the PVC pipe during installation.

“The spacers are quick and easy to install, they also aid in the joining of the pipe providing a strong handle to screw threads together,” said L&D Micro Tunnelling Co-Owner Chris Dean.

The Merri Creek sewer is part of Melbourne Water’s sewerage network, which services customers in the inner northern suburbs of Melbourne.

After inspections revealed that the sewer was in poor condition and in need of an upgrade, Melbourne Water began upgrade works that will ensure a reliable sewage service for a minimum of 50 years.

For more information visit the kwik-ZIP website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

Early bird registrations available for Trenchless Asia 2018

The registration discount will be available until 7 April 2018.

The 10th Trenchless Asia Exhibition and Conference is returning to Kuala Lumpur for the second time in 2018, and is supported by the International Society for Trenchless Technology (ISTT), who will present a Conference Program designed to provide the international community with a forum for comprehensive and up-to-date discussions on Trenchless Technology.

In 2016 the event hosted more than 120 exhibitors and 1,200 visitors from Malaysia, Philippines, Singapore, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, India, Thailand and Australasia.

Its popularity has seen the biennial event become an annual one in 2018.

A full registration comprises access to all conference sessions, refreshments and a buffet lunch, conference paper access, entrance to the exhibition and a certificate of attendance.

Click here to register for Trenchless Asia.

The event will provide local and international attendees – including engineers, contractors, consultants, utility personnel, government officers and researchers – with an opportunity to network and exchange information.

Local and international experts will lead in-depth discussions on many aspects of trenchless installation and repairs, including horizontal directional drilling, cured-in-place pipe, microtunnelling, pipe bursting and more.

For more information visit the Trenchless Asia website.

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Editor Nick Lovering to discuss promotional opportunities at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Images supplied by Trenchless Asia

ASTT 2017 Person of the Year: Jim Shooter

The Person of the Year Award recognises individuals who have made major and sustained contributions to the trenchless industry above and beyond the call of duty that help develop and promote the use of Trenchless Technology.

Mr Shooter encapsulates this quality with his extended engagement with industry events and publications, the majority of which takes place in addition to his normal work activities.

Over the years, he has presented papers at local and international Trenchless Technology conferences, including co-presenting the first paper at the inaugural ASTT Conference in 1992. Mr Shooter is also a regular participant in the ASTT Technical Forums, as an attendee and presenter, and has contributed his work to industry publications such as Trenchless Australasia.

Jim Shooter on site.

A long-time member of the ASTT, Mr Shooter most recently established and chaired the ASTT Microtunnelling Special Interest Group (SIG). The SIG has since developed microtunnelling design guidelines which are a breakthrough from the previous Water Services Association code design for Trenchless Technology.

Mr Shooter’s knowledge has been gained from a lifetime of hard work. In 1976, he completed his Civil Engineering degree at Sydney University, after which he went on to work for the State Rail Authority, before joining Sydney Water.

For 13 years, Mr Shooter worked in the construction section at Sydney Water, acting as Project Manager of Trenchless Technology for his final 2 years with the utility.

In 1994, he joined Pezzimenti Laserbore™ and has now been the New South Wales Manager of Pezzimenti Tunnelbore – a service provider specialising in the installation of underground infrastructure using microtunnelling – for more than 20 years. During the period, Pezzimenti has undertaken more than 1,100 bores.

This article was featured in the December edition of Trenchless Australasia. To view the magazine on your PC, Mac, tablet, or mobile device, click here.

If you have a news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

Registrations available for final ASTT Technical Forum

This year’s final forum will be hosted by NSW Australasian Society for Trenchless Technology (ASTT) Councillor Nabil Issa, and will feature presentations from Sydney Water Senior Engineer Jerry Sunarho, Qenos Market Segment Manager Jeroen Wassenaar and kwik-ZIP NSW Business Development Manager Paul Keegan.

Mr Sunarho is part of the Urban Design and Engineering team at Sydney Water, specialising in structure rehabilitation, corrosion protection, condition assessment and product assessment.

His presentation will focus on the field testing of geopolymers against corrosive sewer environment, a study with aims to evaluate the performance of different polymers, mortars and cements in an aggressive sewer environment.

Mr Wassenaar is responsible for the conception and delivery of the segment strategies for injection and pipe applications, including PE100 pressure pipe resins, as well as driving the evolution and promotion of the product slate at Qenos.

His presentation will feature a comprehensive overview of the Yeppoon Causeway Lake horizontal directional drilling (HDD) project, which utilised Qenos’ PE100 HSCR pipe to augment the capacity of the Livingstone Shire council’s water distribution network.

The final speaker for the evening, Paul Keegan, has worked within the Australian water industry for almost two decades, working with well-known companies like Tyco Water, Eimco Water Technologies, Continental Water and Chemstore.

His presentation will focus on spacers for the trenchless industry, including an overview of product approvals, technical features, spacer selection and sizing, as well as discussing projects that have used kwik-ZIP spacers for grade correction and bundled pipe installations.

Following these presentations, a networking session will take place at the nearby Commercial Hotel, where drinks and canapes will be served.

Registration for the event is just AU$45 for ASTT members and AU$65 for non-members.

Click here to register for the NSW Technical Forum.

The NSW event is sponsored by the generosity of Ditch WitchThe Drain Man and Qenos.

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Editor Nick Lovering to discuss promotional opportunities at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

CDEnviro outlines NDD waste-burden issues

by Diarmaid Connaire, CDEnviro Business Development Manager

Non-destructive digging (NDD) and directional drilling practices are more popular than ever in infrastructure development and remediation because of the assurance of better accuracy and control near sensitive areas of land; however, this growth in the industry has increased the waste burden for many drilling operators.

Trenchless Technology has advanced in recent years, but the water involved within a wet cutting or boring process contains both chemicals and slurry that is problematic to handle, dispose of, or reuse responsibly. Although much safer, NDD and directional tunnelling practices have complicated the waste handling burden, creating a double-edged sword for all involved.

The thick nature of muds containing sand, clay and bentonite creates issues when processing the water. The disposal of this solid/liquid waste would be unlikely at any landfill site; even if it were accepted, it would usually incur a large cost due to its nature and weight.

Furthermore, ‘waste’ material contains many useful, reusable materials that can be recycled and made available for resale. With an increasing focus on the circular economy and more stringent legislation, there is an increasing need for urban recycling solutions instead of rural dumping grounds.

Between a rock and a hard place

Among the most common disposal methods, there does not seem to be a viable option – only a lesser evil. The best from a bad bunch is the landfill disposal method.

Sending drilling muds to landfill may remove the waste burden from the drilling company, but it is costly and detrimental to the environment. Not only that, landfill sites will not always accept this waste due to its thick state.

Meanwhile, the other options are worse, including burying the waste or ‘drying’ the mud in ponds or fields. This not only leaves the waste owner open to future legal implications, but also can be extremely damaging to soils and land.

If leaching occurs, contaminants – such as hydrocarbons, total petroleum hydrocarbons or others – could be released into the water table.

These contaminants can take decades to dissolve and often spread to, and contaminate, other areas. If environmental testing proves that leaching has occurred, the waste-owner may have to shut down their business as a result.

More often than not, these impacts are completely unintentional on the company’s part; however, it seems that the waste-owner may feel that they have no other viable option.

Waste treatment

Treatment of drilling muds is the safest option for the businesses involved and for the environment. Although much safer, sending the NDD/hydro excavated waste for processing by a waste-processing company is not without its challenges either.

The Environmental Protection Authority (EPA) in Victoria sets out strict guidelines with regards to the transport of industrial waste from drilling mud.

The regulations state, along with other factors to consider, that: “The drilling mud must be transported in a vehicle that is safe, secure and leak-free. Prior to transporting drilling mud, the waste transporter must ensure that there is no contaminated residue or material in the tanker/tanker trailer.”

Breakdowns, accidents, and spillages are among the various challenges that a waste-owner can face, not to mention the cost involved.

Safe and secure transport methods must be assured before even considering transporting the muds to another site. In addition, the company with the waste-burden must be aware of what happens to its waste after it is sent for processing.

If the waste finds its way in to soil or land by accident, the company with the original waste-burden could still have to deal with future legal implications.

Waste treatment onsite

Treatment of the muds onsite brings double benefits.

The first advantage of this option is the most obvious: the removal of risk. Effective treatment technology used onsite removes the potential jeopardy involved in transport, while also protecting the company with the waste-burden from possible legal impacts.

The second benefit is less obvious, but equally appealing: advancements in technology mean that waste treatment onsite can not only dewater any clay content of the muds to ensure cheap disposal of the material but also can recover valuable materials. These materials can include sand, stone and organics, producing independent revenue streams.

CDEnviro provides bespoke reception centres for NDD, recovering these materials for resale or reuse. Not only that, the recovered water can also then be treated for reuse.

This give operators greater control of their waste; greater sustainability, reduced disposal costs and materials for resale and reuse.

Perhaps most importantly, the technology provides the answer to the waste burden, ensuring that those conducting sustainable methods, such as NDD, are no longer stuck between a rock and a hard place; with effective technology, NDD/hydro-excavation no longer has to be considered a double-edged sword.

For more information visit the CDEnviro website.

If you have company news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

SA Water pipe replacement program reaches milestone

The four-year AU$137 million program is designed to reduce the number of water main breaks and leaks and limit the impact these incidents have on SA Water’s customers, road users and the wider community.

It includes the replacement of approximately 375 km of water main over the four-year period.

Traditionally, water mains have an asset life of around 100 years; however, a pipe’s age is not always an indication of its potential to experience a performance issue – more than 50 per cent of SA Water’s mains are less than 51 years old.

The Bureau of Meteorology’s recent National Performance Report for urban water utilities states that in 2015-16 SA Water customers experienced 14.9 breaks per 100 km of pipe, compared to the national average of 25.7; only 5 other Australian water utilities achieved a better rate.

By September this year, there had been 2,528 water main breaks and leaks across the South Australia, a 24 per cent decrease compared to the same time in 2016.

In Adelaide’s metropolitan area, the number of incidents during this time dropped by almost 30 per cent.

A statement from the Office of Water and the River Murray Minister Ian Hunter attributed the reduction to two key factors: an increase in the number of water mains being replaced in SA Water’s network; and more consistent rainfall that slowly eased into drier periods, resulting in more stable moisture levels in Adelaide’s clay soils.

“Earlier this year, we announced an additional AU$55 million investment for SA Water’s main replacement program – this demonstrates this State Government’s commitment to improving the reliability of the state’s water supply network,” said Mr Hunter.

“This was a sound investment that is already contributing to an improvement in the performance of the water network, with a notable reduction in the number of water main breaks and leaks this year.

“As part of SA Water’s ongoing water main replacement program, they’re renewing pipes in regional areas, on busy arterial roads and in suburban streets, all with their customers and the wider community at the front of mind.

“Despite news reports to the contrary, the facts confirm the performance of SA Water’s network is very good and continually improving.”

SA Water Chief Executive Roch Cheroux said, “Our water main network comprises more than 27,000 km of pressurised pipe often laid within highly reactive clay soils, so we must be realistic and acknowledge we won’t ever completely stop all water main breaks and leaks.

“I’m really pleased with both the progress of our water main replacement program and the vastly improved way we respond to incidents.

“For example, our Community Support team mobilises quickly across the metropolitan area to support our customers during and after the process of repairing breaks and leaks.

“We’re getting on with improving the reliability of our water network, so the community can get on with their everyday lives.”

For more information visit the SA Water website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Watercare opens EOI for Central Interceptor wastewater project

Bids will be invited for the construction of the Central Interceptor in two stages:

  • EOI – open from 20 October 2017, and will pre-qualify up to four contractor consortia.
  • Request for Proposal – held during 2018, to award a contract for construction of the works.

The EOI will be released via Watercare’s e-procurement portal, TenderLink.

Once completed, the Central Interceptor will increase the capacity of Auckland’s wastewater network.

An earth pressure balance (EPB) tunnel boring machine (TBM) will be used during construction, linking the 4.5 m diameter pipe to 4.4 km of sewers, ranging in size from 2.1 to 2.4 m in diameter.

The tunnel will be constructed between 15 and 110 m underground and will run for approximately 13 km between the suburbs of Western Springs and Mangere.

The TBM will be driven through weak sandstone and may encounter mixed face materials in Auckland’s geology, which is overlain with volcanic soils and rock.

The southern end of the tunnel will extend through marine and alluvial sediments, and then under the Manukau Harbour.

The main tunnel will terminate at a lift pump station that will be constructed at the Mangere Wastewater Treatment Plant.

Shafts for the station will be constructed using a D-Wall method and feature a dual cell configuration approximately 40 m deep; the cells will be 12 m and 26 m in diameter.

The pumps will deliver up to 6 m3/sec through two 1.4 m diameter high density polyethylene rising mains into the treatment plant.

Connections into the existing network built under urban central Auckland will be made via 16 cascade drop shafts that are between 25 and 70 m deep, ranging in diameter from 3 to 12 m.

Land for the shafts – which has already been designated to parks – is owned by Watercare, or its parent organisation Auckland Council.

An option exists to dispose of tunnel spoil at a landfill operation managed by Watercare.

Construction is anticipated to begin in 2019 and to be completed by 2025.

For more information visit the Watercare website.

If you have news you would like featured on Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Registrations open for final ASTT Technical Forums of 2017

The popular forums feature educational presentations from industry experts and an opportunity to network with colleagues and potential clients.

Click here to register for the New Zealand Trenchless Technology Forums Roadshow.

Click here to register for the Victorian and New South Wales (NSW) Technical Forums.

The New Zealand Technical Forums Roadshow will visit Auckland on 7 November and Christchurch on 8 November, and are sponsored by PipeWorks and Iplex Pipelines New Zealand.

Both forums will include an opening address by ASTT New Zealand Councillor Blair Telfer, and will include breakfast and morning tea.

Registration costs for the Technical Forums Roadshows are NZ$75 for ASTT members and NZ$95 for non-members, including GST.

The Victorian forum is scheduled for 23 November in Melbourne and will be sponsored by the generosity of Ditch Witch, Primus Line, The Drain Man and ITS PipeTech.

The NSW event will take place on 30 November and is sponsored by Ditch Witch, The Drain Man and Qenos.

Both the Australian forums will feature a number of presentations, followed by canapes and drinks providing attendees with the opportunity to network and share ideas with colleagues.

Registration costs for the Victorian and NSW Technical Forums are AU$45 for ASTT members and AU$65 for non-members, including GST.

Some sponsorship opportunities are still available for the NSW and New Zealand events.

For sponsorship opportunities, contact Dave Marsh at dmarsh@gs-press.com.au

Speaking opportunities are still available for the New Zealand, Victoria and NSW events.

For speaking opportunities, contact Rebecca Burns at rburns@gs-press.com.au

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Nick Lovering to discuss promotional opportunities at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

CCF Victoria honours projects at 2017 Earth Awards

The event, which took place at Mural Hall at Myer, Melbourne, celebrated the achievements of civil contractors delivering metropolitan and regional infrastructure projects in Victoria.

Awards were presented in six categories, which were based on the size and scale of the projects and judged on the quality and excellence displayed in the areas of construction, environmental and project management.

The winners of the Victorian awards will move through to the CCF National Earth Awards, which will be presented as part of  2017 Australian Infrastructure Summit in Canberra on 20-21 November.

Category 1, for a project value up to AU$1 million, was won by Maw Civil Marine for its Sorrento Step Wall and Rock Revetment Project.

Category 2, for a project value of AU$1 million – AU$5 million, was won by the John HollandKBR joint venture, together with RBM Plumbing and Drainage and Melbourne Water, for the Merri Creek Main Sewer Early Works Project.

Category 3, for a project value of AU$5 million to AU$10 million, was won by Delcon Civil Pty Ltd for the Glenroy Main Drain Upgrade Project.

Category 4, for a project value of AU$10 million to AU$30 million, was won by BMD Constructions and City of Greater Bendigo for the Bendigo Airport Upgrade Stage 2 Project.

Category 5, for a project value of AU$30 Million to AU$75 million, was won by Cut & Fill Pty Ltd for the Sneydes Road Interchange Project.

Finally, Category 6, for a project value of more than AU$75 million, was won by BNMC Alliance ­– comprising Level Crossing Removal Authority, John Holland, KBR, VicRoads, Public Transport Victoria, Metro Trains Melbourne – for the Burke-North-McKinnon-Centre Level Crossing Removal Project.

The winners of each category will be judged against other projects across the county in the National Earth Awards, taking place at the National Press Club on 21 November 2017 in Canberra.

“Once again, the CCF Earth Awards have demonstrated the world class talent that Victoria’s civil industry has to offer,” said CCF CEO John Kilgour.

“These awards also show that with appropriate financial support from our State and Federal Governments, that there is no limit to what our industry can produce to ensure we are able to develop the necessary infrastructure for our growing population.”

For more information visit the CCF website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

September edition of Trenchless Australasia now online

The digital edition can be viewed on a tablet, computer or smartphone. To view the magazine click here.

The September edition of Trenchless Australasia contains:

  • A look at Queensland Urban Utilities’ record-breaking sewer construction
  • An interview with Ditch Witch’s Christopher Malan
  • A project article on Brisbane’s new Cross River Rail
  • A glimpse at the future of water main renewal from Ventia

And much more!

Want more access?

Trenchless Australasia print magazine subscribers receive early access to the digital magazine before the wider industry, ensuring that they can stay up-to-date with the latest news, industry issues and technology. Other exclusive subscriber benefits include:

  • Four annual print editions of the world’s leading magazine for the Australasian trenchless industry, featuring region reviews, project updates, company announcements and regulatory information.
  • Access to the online archives of Trenchless Australasia.
  • Exclusive invitations and discounts to trenchless networking functions, training courses, and major conferences worldwide.

Want to know more? Click here to subscribe to the free fortnightly e-newsletter to stay up-to-date with all the latest news in the trenchless industry.

Trenchless Australasia is now also on Facebook and Twitter. Follow us to receive the best of the Australasian trenchless industry in your newsfeed.

ASTT names award winners at NDDU

The event, sponsored by Ditch Witch, featured the presentation of five awards, including the coveted ASTT Person of the Year which was awarded to Pezzimenti Tunnelbore NSW Manager Jim Shooter.

Person of the Year

A long-time member of the ASTT, Mr Shooter was recently involved in establishing and Chairing the ASTT Special Interest Group (SIG) for Microtunnelling.

The SIG has lead the developed the microtunnelling design guidelines, which are a significant breakthrough from the previous WSA code design for Trenchless Technology.

The majority of Mr Shooter’s tireless efforts have been outside of his normal work activities.

The template for these guidelines have now been mirrored by the ASTT’s horizontal directional drilling (HDD) SIG, with plans to do more in the future.

Young Person of the Year

Suresearch Managing Director Glen Wakelin was awarded the ASTT Young Person of the Year.

Mr Wakelin first took over Suresearch in 2005 when the business predominantly worked on concealed leaks.

Since then, he has expanded the business into the field of hydro excavation, CCTV and, more recently, utility surveying.

Mr Wakelin has grown the business from a one man operation in 2005, to 10-15 staff members in 2010, and 50 staff members in 2016.

New Technology

Aussie Trenchless Supplies’ HOT SLEEVE was named as the winner of the ASTT New Technology Award.

HOT SLEEVE offers a controlled and speedy resin cure for patch liners and T Seals, saving over 60 per cent of crew time during the resin cure period by utilising heat to passively cure the resin patch matrix.

The product allows resin to achieve the maximum pot life with the shortest cure period.

The HOT SLEEVE is portable and easy to use, has a small site footprint and can result in a 60 per cent reduction in cure periods, improving the productivity and profitability of rehabilitation projects.

Project of the Year – New Installation

Queensland-based utility Unitywater was presented the ASTT Project of the Year – New Installation Award for its Noosa River Drill project.

In September 2015, Unitywater’s sewer rising main crossing Weyba Creek at the mouth of the Noosa River failed.

The 30-year-old pipeline had been installed by trenching the pipe 2 m deep into the bed of the creek.

As the pipe had separated at the failure location, repair by relining was not possible and Unitywater elected to complete the rehabilitation project using HDD.

Undertaking an HDD project to complete urgent reactive work required innovative thinking to overcome the obstacles and complete the project in the limited time available.

The fast-track project saw the installation of 350 m of DN 315 product pipe by HDD parallel to, and below, the failed main.

Project of the Year – Rehabilitation

Abergeldie Watertech’s rehabilitation of the Balmain South Eastern Slopes Submain (BSESS) won the ASTT Project of the Year – Rehabilitation Award.

The BSESS is a historic Sydney Water brick oviform sewer, built in 1897.

The utility’s CCTV investigations and assessment of the sewer identified that 630 m of pipe was nearing or had come to the end of its service life.

Sydney Water determined that the only viable cost-effective option was to rehabilitate the BSESS through the installation of structural internal liners and contacted Abergeldie to compete the works.

In March 2016, Abergeldie successfully rehabilitated the 115 m curved asset.

This was achieved by first installing a 12 mm thick cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) “sacrificial” liner and then installing a 16.5 mm thick structural CIPP liner.

Both liners successfully negotiated the bend within the asset without any displacement of bricks or damage to the oviform structure.

The method adopted allowed for the completion of works with no reportable safety incidents.

The ASTT Award winners will be profiled in the December 2017 edition of Trenchless Australasia. Click here to subscribe for the magazine.

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Queensland’s record-breaking GRP installation

Queensland Urban Utilities is investing AU$55 million to build a new 4.25 km sewer main between Wecker Road, Mansfield and Cadogan Street, Carindale in Brisbane’s southeast, known as the Bulimba Creek Sewer Upgrade Stage 2. Previous stages 1 and 1A of the project were completed between 2004 and 2013 in the suburbs of Mansfield, Wishart, Eight Mile Plains and Macgregor.

The existing Bulimba Creek trunk sewer services about 158,000 people to the southeast of the Brisbane CBD. It’s comprised of approximately 62 km of sewer pipes ranging in diameter from 375 mm to 1,650 mm and discharges to the Gibson Island Sewage Treatment Plant. Works are expected to be completed by the end of 2018, weather permitting.

“This project will cater for future growth and development in the catchment area for at least the next 50 years and reduce the likelihood of sewage overflows,” said Queensland Urban Utilities Principal Engineer Scott Stevens.

Queensland Urban Utilities developed a Reference Design and undertook all preliminary investigations along the selected route. All construction works were outsourced under a two-stage competitive open tender process and an Australian-Japanese joint venture (JV), comprising of Abergeldie Constructions Pty Ltd and Obayashi Corporation, was appointed to design and construct the upgrade.

“The Abergeldie-Obayashi JV was selected via a robust ‘value for money’ assessment that considered tunnelling experience, design and construction capability, capacity to deliver the work, proposed methodology, proposed tunnelling and other construction, plant and equipment offered to undertake the work, as well as delivery management, quality, safety and environmental standards.

“We thoroughly review the design deliverables to ensure it meets our quality and design standards before approving each stage. Queensland Urban Utilities also manages all community engagement activities.”

The project team is comprised of experts from across the utility, including principal civil, mechanical and electrical engineers, contract managers, health and safety officers and community engagement consultants. Multiple parts of Queensland Urban Utilities has an internal stake in the project, including infrastructure delivery, planning, the utility’s shareholder team, as well as media and marketing.

Brisbane City Council is an external stakeholder in the project, along with residents and businesses in the construction area and other users of the road, footpath, bikeway and recreation grounds.

A feasibility study identified several potential options for the sewer’s route, in length and construction techniques. However, the most direct and cost-effective path was along Scrub Road, using microtunnelling through Belmont Hills Bushland Reserve.

Speaking on the project, Abergeldie Complex Infrastructure’s Tunnels and Shafts Manager Grant Schultz said, “As it’s a gravity sewer, the depths required to maintain grade are up to 47 m below ground level, which eliminates a trenched option.

“In addition, the alignment travels along and across major roads with residential buildings on both sides of the road. Thus, the trenchless option allows for small work sites which minimise disruption to the community.”

Mr Stevens agreed that the depth ruled out open cut methods.

“Given the depth of the proposed sewer was more than 40 m, only modern trenchless methods proved feasible. The final alignment utilises long drives (several curved) and strategically located shafts to minimise disturbance to local residents and motorists,” said Mr Stevens.

“The tunnel drive lengths range from 550 m to 850 m. Several of the shafts have been designed to specifically launch in both directions to reduce the required sizes of the deep retrieval shafts.

“The deepest shaft being constructed is a 5.5 m diameter retrieval shaft approximately 47 m deep, near the top of Belmont Hill Bushland Reserve. The footprint of the physical works for the bulk of the tunnel construction is limited to a confined site located at strategic positions to avoid disruption to the community.”

Caitlin Gamble, whose artwork was selected for Sewey’s design.

The proposed length of the drives, depths and geologic conditions, meant that selection of the microtunnel boring machine (MTBM) was critical to the success of the project. Abergeldie decided on a Herrenknecht AVN1500TB, named Sewey, to complete the job.

“The AVN1500TB is a slurry shield MTBM. This type of machine is perfectly suited for excavating through the varying ground conditions that are expected to be encountered and the drive lengths that were required,” Mr Schultz said.

Expanding on this, Mr Stevens said “As sections of the tunnel alignment are 30 m below the water-table, it is imperative that access to the face can be achieved under all circumstances.

“As risk mitigation, the contractor opted for a machine capable of utilising a hyperbaric chamber (air lock), which would enable safe access to the face when required if groundwater inflow rates exceed the pumping capacity.

“The minimum recommended size machine to accommodate an air lock is 1,500 mm ID, which was an influencing factor in the selection of the Herrenknecht AVN1500TB machine. It utilises a medium voltage supply and in-machine power pack and permits drive lengths in excess of 850 m.

“The preferred jacking pipe material for the project was 1,780 mm OD, SN55,000 ‘Flowtite’ glass-reinforced plastic (GRP) jacking pipe supplied by RPC. The pipe was supplied in 6 m lengths which reduces the frequency of pipe changes, maximising production.

“The pipe joint permits enough deflection to safely navigate the desired 1,000 m curve drives without impacting the jacking capacity of the pipe. Given the long drive lengths and curved alignments, a VMT Navigation system in combination with frequent gyro surveys is being used to ensure the sewer is constructed within the desired horizontal tolerances and grades.

The next scheduled drive from MH5 to MH6 is 850 m in length and utilises a 1,000 m curve over the first 230 m, it will traverse through Argillite and Brisbane Tuff and beneath the Bulimba Creek with reduced cover (3.6 m).

“The drive, when completed, will be the longest pipe-jack using GRP pipe materials in Australia,” said Mr Stevens.

The project has not been without challenges, especially from a community engagement perspective as above ground construction work is very close to houses and includes round-the-clock tunnelling. Mr Stevens explained that the project management team has taken a number of measures to mitigate these impacts such as installing sound suppression barriers around the shaft sites, limiting truck movements during peak times and using approved traffic management to ensure the safety of motorists and pedestrians.

“Queensland Urban Utilities committed to a ‘no-surprises’ approach with all stakeholders, including the community, promising to be open and transparent about the works and how the impacts will be managed. Residents can also call the project team for assistance or information at any time on a dedicated hotline,” he said.

“One of the work sites is at the edge of a local rugby league football field and we need to use their car park for access. To minimise the impacts on the club, we reduced deliveries during game times, graded the car park surface regularly and also sprayed water to reduce dust.

“We also involved the local club in the project by facilitating a competition to name and design the MTBM. In addition, five sewer maintenance holes off Wecker Road have been transformed into colourful works of art.

“A local artist worked with students from a nearby high school to come up with designs. These creative initiatives were not only a way to ‘give back’ to the community, but we hope they have inspired local residents to think about their sewerage service. With most sewer pipes hidden underground, it’s easy for people to flush and forget.”

Queensland Urban Utilities Communications and Engagement Consultant Chloe Carpenter and Project Manager Will Campbell with the MTBM.

Preference for trenchless

Queensland Urban Utilities uses trenchless methods where possible, to reduce the impact on the community and increase safety for its workers. It is using no-dig methods for other projects underway at the moment, including microtunnelling a new service tunnel that runs beneath the Brisbane River from Kenmore to Jindalee in the city’s western suburbs.

“The service tunnel will accommodate new water and sewerage pressure pipelines. The tunnel is a 560 m curved alignment (compound vertical and horizontal) and traverses from alluvium and hard bedrock, below the water table,” said Mr Stevens.

“The tunnelling is also being undertaken by Abergeldie-Obayashi, using an AVN1500TB machine. The use of the hyperbaric chamber mounted on the back of the machine has proved crucial to the success of the project, providing safe access to the front of the machine to permit cutter changes and maintenance.

“Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) will be used for another cross river water pipeline from Murarrie to Pinkenba in Brisbane’s east which has been designed and constructed by Comdain Infrastructure.

“The new Bartley’s to Wellers Hill river crossing consists of 2 km of DN 750 MSCL trunk water main and a 800 mm OD, PE PN 20 HDD approximately 1.1 km in length beneath the Brisbane River. The drilling operations, which will be undertaken by Coe Drilling, will use bi-directional drilling techniques.”

As well as capital projects responding to growth, Queensland Urban Utilities also employs trenchless methods to rehabilitate aging assets, such as relining Brisbane’s largest and oldest sewer pipe, the S1 Sewer. It is also undertaking water main relining trials with the intention to utilise possible trenchless technologies to rehabilitate vast kilometres of AC and cast iron pipe within the reticulation network.

“Queensland Urban Utilities is committed to excellence in water and sewerage services that meet the evolving needs of our customers and enhance our communities,” said Mr Stevens.

This article was featured in the September edition of Trenchless Australasia. To view the magazine on your PC, Mac, tablet, or mobile device, click here.

For more information visit the Queensland Urban Utilities website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Utility using trenchless to construct AU$175 million of infrastructure

The works include the construction of a new water pipeline underneath the Brisbane River from Murrarie to Pinkenba, the building of a new trunk sewer – including a 48 m deep access shaft for a tunnel boring machine – from Mansfield to Carindale, and tunnelling under the Brisbane River from Kenmore to Jindalee for new water and sewer pipelines.

The utility is also using trenchless relining to rehabilitate Brisbane’s oldest and largest sewer pipe, the S1 Main Sewer.

“We’ve always got major capital works underway, but this is the most construction we’ve seen at once in our organisation’s history,” said Queensland Urban Utilities spokesperson Sally Prosser.

“Across three major projects, more than 4.2 km of new water pipe is being laid and more than 6.8 km of new sewers, building on our existing network of more than 18,000 km of pipe.

“A fourth project involves relining 5.7 km of Brisbane’s S1 Main Sewer, which is 100 years old and buried eight storeys under busy Kingsford Smith Drive.

“These works increase the resilience and reliability of our water and sewerage network and ensure we’re catering for South East Queensland’s growing population.”

Ms Prosser said water and sewerage is an essential service that the utility’s more 1.4 million customers relied on every day.

“With all the cranes across the city, it’s easy to see the skyline changing right before your eyes. That’s not the case for the water and sewerage network,” she said.

“It’s a hidden service, but as projects like these demonstrate, a lot goes on behind the scenes to deliver fresh, clean drinking water to your tap and allow you to flush and forget.”

For more information visit the Queensland Urban Utilities website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Registration for No-Dig Down Under closes on Friday!

The event, which is now less than seven days away, will take place at the on 12-15 September at the Gold Coast Convention and Exhibition Centre.

Click here to register for No-Dig Down Under 2017.

NDDU includes a full conference program, training sessions, a technical program and networking opportunities with trenchless professionals, educators and experts from Australasia and around the world.

Full conference registration includes access to all conference sessions, an exhibition hall pass, catering throughout the event and a ticket to each of the social networking events.

Social functions

The exhibition opening, sponsored by Empire Infrastructure, will be attended by many Australasian VIPs, exhibitors and delegates before the exhibition and conference gets underway.

The Boat Cruise, sponsored by Vermeer, will take place on Wednesday 13 September, leaving Mariners Cove Marina for a 30 minute trip on a luxurious catamaran where guests will enjoy VIP service with canapés and drinks, before arriving on an exclusive tropical paradise at Stradbroke Island for a five star dinner, drinks and entertainment.

The final NDDU social event, sponsored by Ditch Witch, is the ASTT Gala Dinner and Awards Evening on Thursday 14 September at The Star Gold Coast.

The prestigious Gala Dinner will feature top class entertainment and a three-course meal, bringing delegates and international guests together to celebrate the industry’s achievements while also giving guests the perfect opportunity to network.

The social events are a key part of NDDU, providing an opportunity to relax, have fun and make lasting connections with colleagues and potential clients.

Additional tickets to the social functions are also available for purchase for partners, spouses or clients.

Training courses

In 2017, NDDU will also feature three training courses on horizontal directional drilling (HDD), cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) and pipe bursting, the content of which has been exclusively licenced from the North American Society of Trenchless Technology.

Click here to register for the ASTT Training Courses.

The ASTT has licensed the training courses and adapted the material – which is world’s best practice – for Australasian audiences.

For more information visit the No-Dig Down Under 2017 website.

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Broadspectrum and Cadagua sign MoU for joint operations

Both companies are part of the Ferrovial Group and have operations in the water sector.

Broadspectrum services a number of Australian and New Zealand water utilities, providing asset management, maintenance and operation works.

Cadagua has operations in the Middle East, Europe and North America, providing design, process engineering, construction and operation services to complex water, wastewater, and advanced water treatment and desalination plants.

Working together will allow the companies to build on Broadspectrum’s reputation and pursue more complex projects, while also offering a broader range of services for those projects.

“We are very excited about the opportunity to work within our group of companies, with Cadagua, and combine their process engineering and operations capability with Broadspectrum’s local presence and track record in asset improvement and maintenance,” said Broadspectrum Chief Executive of Urban Infrastructure Sandra Dodds.

“We look forward to working closely on several forthcoming design and construction and design-build-operate-maintain projects.”

Referring to the MoU, Cadagua Managing Director Pablo Riesco said, “We are confident that Cadagua will contribute to the growth of the Ferrovial Group in the Australian water infrastructure market by providing advance technical solutions which are sustainable, innovative and cost-effective.

For more information visit the Broadspectrum website.

If you have company news you would like featured in Trenchless Australia contact Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Registrations available for ASTT Training Courses

The ASTT has licensed the training courses and adapted the material – which is world’s best practice – for Australasian audiences.

This educational initiative has been made possible by the generous support of the Australian Drilling Industry Training Committee (ADITC).

CIPP Good Practices Course

CIPP is one of the most widely used and accepted pipeline rehabilitation methods; it is cost-effective, increases flow capacity and significantly reduces infiltration and ex-filtration.

This course provides an overview of wastewater mainline and lateral pipe rehabilitation using CIPP, and covers everything from planning and design, through to job completion.

It is best suited to council, utility and government employees, asset managers seeking new knowledge of rehabilitation techniques, and young professionals working in the trenchless rehabilitation subsector.

HDD Good Practices Guidelines Course

The HDD Good Practices Guidelines course provides an in-depth overview of HDD and covers six topics: (1) operation and application; (2) equipment and materials; (3) planning, including surface and geological investigations, utility surveys, bore planning, and regulations and permitting; (4) jobsite safety; (5) risk reduction, trouble shooting and mitigation; and (6) design.

The course is aimed at council, utility and government employees, civil and geotechnical engineers, beginner drillers, and young professionals working the trenchless installation subsector.

Pipe Bursting Good Practices Course

Pipe bursting is the perfect no-dig process to replace an existing line with a completely new, larger pipe – without excavating. This construction technique is recognised as one of the only methods of trenchless rehabilitation that replaces an existing line with a completely new pipe, providing a total pipe replacement and allows for the replacement of an existing pipe with a new line of equal or larger diameter – to maintain or increase flow capabilities.

The Pipe Bursting Good Practices Course will provide an in-depth overview of pipe bursting and covers four topic areas: (1) the types, methods and applications of pipe bursting; (2) planning and preliminary design of a pipe bursting job; (3) design and construction considerations; and (4) troubleshooting and problem solving.

The course is best suited to council, utility and government employees, civil and geotechnical engineers, and young professionals working the trenchless industry.

Registration for these one-day training courses is available from AU$490 for ASTT Members and AU$590 for non-members.

If you are interested in registering for the training courses, contact conferences@gs-press.com.au or visit the No-Dig Down Under website.

Queensland Urban Utilities Bulimba Creek Stage 2 Sewer Upgrade progresses

Work on the project includes a new 4.25 km sewer main southeast of Brisbane, between Wecker Road, Mansfield, and Cadogan Street, Carindale.

The existing Bulimba Creek Trunk Sewer comprises 62 km of sewer pipes ranging in diameter from 375 mm to 1,650 mm and provides water and sewerage services to more than 158,000 customers.

Mid-tier infrastructure provider Abergeldie Complex Infrastructure Pty Ltd and civil engineering contractors Obayashi Corporation formed Abergeldie-Obayashi Joint Venture (JV), which was awarded the contract to design and construct the Stage 2 upgrade.

 

The project is utilising microtunnelling in order to reduce the impact on residents and the environment, with most above ground works concentrated at entry and exit shafts.

A tunnel boring machine (TBM) is boring a 1,500 mm diameter tunnel, while a jacking machine pushes the new sewer pipes in behind it, to be pulled through as the TBM advances.

Since August 2016, an exit shaft has been constructed at Edwards Reserve off Tones Road in Mansfield, two TBM entry shafts were constructed – one at the Allen Innes Oval in Mansfield and one in Carindale – and the TBM has tunnelled between the Allen Innes Oval entry and the Edwards Reserve exit.

At the end of July, the TBM will be brought to a launch shaft on the corner of Scrub and Pine Mountain Roads, Carindale. The TBM will tunnel 852m, to date, the longest tunnel drive of a machine this size, to the exit shaft in Edwards Reserve.

There will then be an additional three tunnel drives totalling 2236m on completion of this drive.

Stage 1 and 1A of the Bulimba Creek upgrade were completed in 2004-2006 and 2011-2013 in Mansfield, Wishart, Eight Mile Plains and MacGregor.

Stage 2 is expected to be completed by mid-2018.

For more information visit the Queensland Urban Utilities website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Media supplied by Queensland Urban Utilities

Freeway microtunnelling

One of Australia’s busiest roads, the Monash Freeway provides a vital link for motorists between the Melbourne CBD and the south eastern suburbs, where more than half of the city’s workforce is employed. In 2016, the Victorian State Government announced plans to upgrade the freeway as part of the AU$5.5 billion West Gate Tunnel Project project – a public private partnership with Transurban.

Fulton Hogan was awarded the contract to manage the freeway upgrade, which includes the addition of 30 km of extra traffic lanes, the strengthening and widening of associated bridges and upgrades to ramps. Construction started in September 2016 and is expected to be completed sometime in 2018.

As part of the upgrade, Fulton Hogan subcontracted Pezzimenti Trenchless to complete a 900 mm diameter bore crossing below the freeway at Heatherton Road, Doveton. Stretching 108 m, it also required the pipejacking installation of a 700 mm Humes reinforced concrete pipeline underneath the off ramp, median strips, and the inbound and outbound lanes of the Monash.

To complete the project, it utilised a Pezzimenti Laserbore – manufactured laser guided, extraction, microtunnelling machine. It bored through a mixture of sandy clays; as it progressed it also encountered sections of fill along the alignment, which posed a challenge, but this was eventually negotiated.

As the closure of the outbound land was required to excavate the retrieval shaft, the retrieval of the bore head had to be completed during the night to cause less disruption to commuters and road users.

Construction took place during a particularly wet April in Melbourne, which presented significant challenges to the Pezzimenti crew. Approximately 50 m into the drive, the bore and launch pit became inundated with water. Undeterred the team pushed on and was able to complete the construction without incident on 27 April 2017.

This article was featured in the June edition of Trenchless Australasia. To view the magazine on your PC, Mac, tablet, or mobile device, click here.

For more information visit the Pezzimenti Trenchless website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Assistant Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Spiire designs stormwater harvesting at Melbourne Airport

Over five years, Spiire worked in close consultation with Melbourne Airport to design a ‘holistic’ stormwater solution for an area of the airport prone to flooding and poor quality water. The Airport Drive Extension and Steele Creek North Stormwater Enhancement Project, which was awarded the prestigious Stormwater Australia Excellence in Infrastructure Award last year, encompassed four aspects of water management to create a sustainable water system for years to come: flood mitigation, water conveyance, improved water quality and the recycling of stormwater.

Completed in 2015, it included the installation of a system to recycle water from the airport within the Steele Creek North catchment area, providing an additional water supply as well as improving the quality of the water that is discharged. It also included other aspects of water management, including retention systems, infiltration measures and rainwater harvesting to improve water quality in receptor water systems.

In his early consultations with Melbourne Airport, Spiire Project Manager and Design Lead Leigh Holmes says the project quickly developed into something more than just mitigating the risk of flood. He says it had to be designed with the four aspects of water management as the priority, and the foundation of the outcome.

“The Steele Creek North catchment, which is approximately 430 hectares, incorporates long-term carparks, buildings and the airport’s business park. It is one of the only catchments that is discharged downstream into neighbouring residential areas, so prior to development the airport needed a strategy to mitigate the risk of flooding downstream,” Mr Holmes says.

Spiire entered into a design and construction contract with John Holland, who subcontracted some of the work including the main civil earthworks which featured the trenchless boring. The project contract included a 100,000 m3 flood retention basin to protect residents downstream and a 7,000 m2 sedimentation basin with a rain garden, one of the largest in Australia.

The rain garden allowed the runoff from the airport area to be treated to best-practice standards, as well as mechanically treating the catchments stormwater. The project is one of Victoria’s largest stormwater harvesting projects, producing over 130 ML of treated water per year, which is supplied to airport operations and the surrounding areas.

The project harvests 130 ML of treated water a year for use in the airport and the surrounding area.

“Put simply, we designed a system that collected all the stormwater, cleaned it and then filtered it back into the end users like the airport’s toilet system, irrigation at the Essendon Football Club’s new facility in Tullamarine, car washing facilities and cooling towers at the airport which use a lot of water,” Mr Holmes says.

“In regards to the cooling towers, we were looking for a constant demand for water and wanted to push the boundaries of how the treated water could be utilised. There was obviously concern around using the water in cooling towers.

“So, we went through a series of risk workshops, operations and maintenance workshops to make sure that everyone knew how to mitigate the risks and ultimately produce a consistent end product that was safe to use in such an important piece of the airport’s infrastructure.

“Stormwater is a highly variable water source and we had challenges working out the best treatment train for that system. Specifically, there were some issues around stability which we solved by adding coagulants,” he says.

Mr Holmes says the project included several challenges, including that it could not disrupt the airport’s operations. This was solved – in part – by the use of microtunnelling. He says the design and construction team also had to innovate to overcome time constraints, with just 18 months to complete the design and construction.

“There are so many services in the construction area, not to mention the airport had to operate 24/7, so it was imperative that we maintained access while the water infrastructure was being constructed. We found boring was a solution because it mitigated the risk to operations at the airport.

“However, the main challenge was speed of delivery. We had 18 months to turnaround the design and construction to the end product, which we overcame by communicating and working openly with John Holland, as well as using some innovative construction techniques to speed things up.

“One of these, was the installation of a 5 ML underground storage tank, which we installed using a precast method. We used Humes’ StormTrap® system, which involved surrounding it with a liner and pouring 5 ML worth of culvert systems in there, which enabled a quicker turnaround.”

The project not only reduced the airport’s water consumption, but dramatically improved the water quality of the Steele Creek North catchment. Mr Holmes says it completed under external pressures from community and environmental groups concerned with the affect the project would have on the area.

“There was quite a few issues with water quality downstream too, with organisations such as the Friends of Steele Creek, the EPA regularly monitoring the water, trying to fix what was going on there. As a result we put together a strategy to help improve the water quality too,” he says.

Mr Holmes and Spiire are currently working with Melbourne Airport on planning for future works on the site.

For more information visit the Spiire website.

This article was featured in the March 2017 edition of Trenchless Australasia. To view the magazine on your PC, Mac, tablet, or mobile device, click here.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Assistant Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Early bird registrations available for No-Dig Down Under

Taking place on the Gold Coast on 12-15 of September, NDDU includes training sessions, a technical program and networking opportunities with trenchless professionals, educators and experts from Australasia and around the world.

Early Bird registrations opened on 14 February 2017, and will remain open until COB 14 July 2017. The Early Bird rate entitles registrants to an AU$200 discount on full conference registration.

Click here to register for No-Dig Down Under 2017.

Full conference registration includes access to all conference sessions, an exhibition hall pass, catering throughout the event and a ticket to each of the social networking events including:

For more information visit the No-Dig Down Under 2017 website

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Editor Annie Ferguson to discuss promotional opportunities at aferguson@gs-press.com.au

McConnell Dowell makes new appointment in NZ

Mr Wyllie, who has more than 30 years of experience in the industry, was previously with Downer as Executive General Manager and has a track record for overseeing project execution and sustained commercial growth.

He takes over the role from Roger McRae, who has stepped down after more than 16 years in the job and 30 years with McConnell Dowell.

“We would like to thank Roger for all he’s done, and we look forward to maintaining an ongoing working relationship with him as he moves into the next phase of his career,” said McConnell Dowell Group Chief Executive Scott Cummins.

“I look forward to working directly with Fraser, whose leadership and people skills have been reflected in his successful track record.

“McConnell Dowell was founded in New Zealand in 1961, and remains an extremely important market for us.

“I’m confident Fraser will make a strong contribution in terms of successful project delivery, profitability and sustainable growth,” said Mr Cummins.

McConnell Dowell is currently undertaking several infrastructure projects in New Zealand and the Pacific Islands, including on roads, waste water treatment facilities, rails, tunnels and rebuilding Christchurch’s earthquake-hit infrastructure.

Mr Wyllie is expected to be in the role at the start of August 2017.

For more information visit the McConnell Dowell website.

If you have company news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Assistant Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au

Last chance: nominate for ASTT awards today

The awards recognise excellence, innovation and achievement in Australia and New Zealand’s trenchless industry.

The prestigious awards will be judged by the ASTT Council and presented at No-Dig Down Under’s official Gala Dinner and Awards Evening on Thursday 14 September 2017.

Nominating your project or colleague will give you and your company international recognition by highlighting your achievements to key stakeholders in the trenchless industry.

In 2017 there will be five categories available for nomination. Further information on these categories can be found below.

Nominations for the awards close this Thursday 1 June 2017. Submit your nomination today.

Project of the year – Rehabilitation

The Rehabilitation Project of the Year Award recognises innovation, advancements in technology, environmental benefits and occupational health and safety benefits in rehabilitation projects utilising Trenchless Technology.

Project of the year – New Installation

New Installation Project of the Year recognises innovation, advancements in technology, environmental benefits and occupational health and safety benefits in new installation projects utilising Trenchless Technology.

New Technology – Machine, tool, material, system or technique

New Technology should demonstrate a practical development of trenchless systems or equipment that results in benefits such as improved economy, accuracy, speed of drive or replacement, ability to overcome difficult installations, or similar.

Person of the Year

The ASTT Person of the Year Award recognises an individual who has made major and sustained contributions to the trenchless industry in any area of activity within the industry. The award recognises a contribution over and above the call of duty to grow, develop and promote the use of Trenchless Technology across Australasia and indeed around the world.

Young Person of the Year

The Young ASTT Person of the Year Award recognises the important role younger members of the Australasian trenchless community play in the growth of the industry.

The Young ASTT Person of the Year is someone who is engaged with the industry and the promotion of Trenchless Technology, has significantly contributed to the industry over the past year, and is aged 40 or under on 1 September 2015.

For more information visit the No-Dig Down Under website.

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Editor Annie Ferguson to discuss promotional opportunities at aferguson@gs-press.com.au

Final chance to advertise in Australasian Trenchless Directory 2017

Print or online marketing in the Directory is a proven way to increase company exposure and improve brand awareness.

Companies can stand out from competitors with high visibility, while communicating information about products and/or services to potential clients through a company description.

Advertisers are able to select as many product and service categories as desired and can advertise their full breadth of products and services, allowing them to be more readily found by readers.

Advertisers are also able to include a company logo next to their listing, further increasing brand awareness.

The final deadline to purchase advertising is 12 May 2017. To discuss advertising opportunities contact Dave Marsh on +61 3 9248 5122 or dmarsh@gs-press.com.au

Early bird registrations available for No-Dig Down Under

Taking place on the Gold Coast on 12-15 of September, NDDU includes training sessions, a technical program and networking opportunities with trenchless professionals, educators and experts from Australasia and around the world.

Early Bird registrations opened on 14 February 2017, and will remain open until COB 14 July 2017. The Early Bird rate entitles registrants to an AU$200 discount on full conference registration.

Click here to register for No-Dig Down Under 2017.

Full conference registration includes access to all conference sessions, an exhibition hall pass, catering throughout the event and a ticket to each of the social networking events including:

For more information visit the No-Dig Down Under 2017 website

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Editor Annie Ferguson to discuss promotional opportunities at aferguson@gs-press.com.au

ASTT hosts first NSW Technical Forum for 2017

Held on 28 March, the event took place at a new location in Bankstown in Sydney’s southwest and was attended by more than 30 individuals from the local trenchless industry.

The event featured three presentations:

  • Blake Curtis of ITS PipeTech on the Mornington Peninsula culvert renewal project
  • Lance Horlyck from SASTTI on the ASTT’s Linings Special Interest Group (SIG)
  • Jim Shooter and Scott Wells from Pezzimenti Tunnelbore on the record-breaking construction of a 440 m intercept bore using microtunnelling

The presentations were followed by some valuable networking time and refreshments. The event was made possible with sponsorship from Ditch Witch, The Drain Man and ITS PipeTech.

Lance Horlyck presented on the ASTT’s Linings SIG.

This forum was organised by the ASTT’s events partner, Great Southern Press, who manages Technical Forums in New South Wales, Victoria and New Zealand.

The next ASTT Technical Forums will be held on 13 July in Victoria and 27 July in New South Wales.

If you are interested in sponsoring one of these events, please contact Dave Marsh on dmarsh@gs-press.com.au

If you would like to present at an upcoming Technical Forum contact Annie Ferguson on aferguson@gs-press.com.au

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Editor Annie Ferguson to discuss promotional opportunities: aferguson@gs-press.com.au

Microtunnelling on CRL reaches milestone

The City Rail Link (CRL) will extend Auckland’s passenger rail system past Britomart to connect to the existing regional rail network at Mt Eden, and provide for an estimated population growth of 700,000 in the next 30 years.

CRL Project Director Chris Meale said a microtunnel boring machine (MTBM), which has been excavating and installing a new stormwater pipe under Albert St, had finished the first leg of its journey.

The MTBM was chosen for the project due to its safety benefits, as it kept workers out of the tunnel and provided a far greater level of control over the rate of excavation and the management of different ground conditions.

“What will be a highly efficient and reliable transport choice for Auckland is now visibly taking shape,” Mr Meale said.

 

The CRL has also released a tender for the design, procurement, installation and commissioning of all track tunnel work and rail systems between Britomart Station and the Western Line at Mt Eden.

It is currently seeking expressions of interest for the design, procurement, installation and commissioning of all track tunnel work and rail systems between Britomart Station and the Western Line at Mt Eden.

Tendered works include the construction of 7 m diameter twin tunnels running from Mt Eden station to the southern end of Aotea Station, via the Karangahape Road Station.

A station near Aotea Square will be built, with entrances at Wellesley and Victoria St, as well as a station in Mercury Ln, just off Karangahape Rd. The present Mount Eden train station will also be extended and redeveloped.

Construction works started in June 2016 and are expected to take five and a half years.

For more information visit the CRL website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Assistant Editor Nick Lovering at nlovering@gs-press.com.au