50 m long mural dazzles Mannum to Adelaide pipeline

In collaboration with the Murray River, Lakes and Coorong Tourism Alliance, the Mid-Murray Council and Palmer’s Collier Park Community Association, South Australian artist Jack Fran has painted a mural on a 50 m section of the Mannum to Adelaide pipeline.

The 87 km long pipeline delivers raw River Murray water to SA Water’s drinking water treatment plant in Anstey Hill, before being distributed to thousands of customers across metropolitan Adelaide.

SA Water’s general manager of strategy, engagement and innovation Sandra Ricci said SA Water will continue to investigate ways to visually improve infrastructure for the benefit of the community.

“The Mannum to Adelaide Pipeline plays a critical role in delivering water to thousands of our customers, and we recognise the concrete exterior provides the perfect canvas for large-scale art projects for locals and passers-by through the region,” said Ricci.

“Taking just five days to paint, the artwork recognises the area’s amazing achievement of being recognised as the River Murray Dark Sky Reserve – one of only fifteen located around the world, and the only recognised dark sky reserve in Australia.

“This is an excellent example of people across the community working together to conceive yet another tourism attraction to the region, and to see the final product adorning the pipeline for everyone to enjoy is a credit to Jack and his talents.”

Tourism development manager with the Murray River, Lakes and Coorong Tourism Alliance, Bill Nehmy said the artwork would be a great benefit to the areas tourism sector.

“The River Murray area already has a diverse and popular range of silo artworks in Karoonda and Coonalpyn, and this piece provides yet another addition to this art trail,” said Nehmy.

“This will be a drawcard to bring tourists to our region for years to come, and we are excited for everyone to enjoy the end result.”

Click here to check out the expansive 50 m mural on SA Water’s socials.

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Woodside, SA

SA Water installs PVC mains for Woodside

The new pipe being laid beneath Tolmer Road is among 47,000 m of water mains being installed for SA Water customers across regional SouthAustralia over the next year. 

The new pipes are made from PVC, which is chemically inert, corrosion resistant and more resistant to soil movement compared to fibre cement. 

SA Water’s general manager of sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said that continued investment in water network upgrades is an important part of the utility’s water services for its customers. 

“Despite soil movement and other environmental factors being major contributing factors to leaks and breaks in our statewide network, our water main replacement program ensures we can proactively work  to limit their frequency,” said Lewry. 

“With water mains having a lifespan of up to 100 years, these new pipes ensure we can continue to deliver clean, safe drinking water to local customers well into the future.”

Construction will take around eight weeks to complete, and SA Water asks residents and road users to take note of localised traffic management procedures in place. 

For more information visit the SA Water website. 

SA Water installs new Murray Bridge water main

SA Water installs new Murray Bridge water main

SA Water plans to start installing a new water main as part of the utility’s $155 million four-year water main management program.

Laid beneath Brinkley Road, the new pipe is part of 47,000 m of water mains being installed in the ground for SA Water customers throughout regional South Australia.

SA Water’s General Manager of Sustainable Infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the new pipe is constructed from PVC, a more resistant material than fibro-cement.

“With water mains having a lifespan of up to 100 years, these new pipes ensure we can continue to deliver clean, safe drinking water to local customers well into the future,” Lewry said.

“Continuing to invest in upgrades to our water network, like here in Murray Bridge, is an important part of how we can deliver trusted water services for our customers,” Lewry said.

Lewry said the installation targets leaks and breaks.

“Despite soil movement and other environmental factors being major contributing factors to leaks and breaks in our state-wide network, our water main replacement program ensures we can proactively work to limit their frequency,” she said.

SA Water advises residents and road users to take note of localised traffic management whilst the installation is proceeding, Lewry added.

“We will also ensure our customers are notified of any temporary water supply interruptions that are necessary when we move their connections over from the old to new pipes,” she said.

Other installations in the $155 million program include the upgrade to the Redbanks water main, which was the first of the water mains to be installed.

Due to the new main’s length, construction will take around seven months to complete, with works typically occurring Monday to Friday between 7am and 6pm.

For more information visit the SA Water website.

SA water upgrades water pipe

Upgrade to Redbanks water main

The project is part of the state’s $155 million four-year water main management program.   

The new pipes laid beneath Verner Road will be the first of 47,000 m of water mains embedded into the ground, enabling SA Water customers to have access to water from regional South Australia.   

SA Water’s general manager of sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the new pipes will be made of PVC, a more resistant pipe material to soil movement, in contrasting to the previous pipes made from fibro-cement.  

“Continuing to invest in upgrades to our water network, like here in Redbanks, is an important part of how we can deliver trusted water services for our customers,” Lewry said.   

SA Water acknowledged that despite soil movement and other environmental factors being major contributing risks to leaks and breaks, the new water main replacement will be able to heavily limit frequency of disruptions.  

“With water mains having a lifespan of up to 100 years, these news pipes ensure we can continue to deliver clean, safe drinking water to local customers well into the future”, said Lewry.  

SA Water aims to complete all works within eight weeks, with construction likely taking place Monday to Friday between 7 am to 5 pm within Redbanks.  

“For the safety of our people and the local community, we ask residents and road users to please take not of localised traffic management in place while the works are underway,” Lewry said.  

“We will also ensure our customers are notified of any temporary water supply interruptions that are necessary when we move their connections over from old to new pipes.” 

For more information visit the SA Water website

Barossa, SA

SA Water lays new pipe for Gawler East

The new main, which is being laid beneath Barossa Avenue, is among 47,000 m of new pipe going in the ground for SA Water customers across regional South Australia over the next year. 

SA Water general manager for sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the new pipe is made from corrosion resistant PVC. 

“Continuing to invest in upgrades to our water network, like here in Gawler East, is an important part of how we can deliver trusted water services for our customers,” said Lewry. 

“Despite soil movement and other environmental factors being major contributing factors to leaks and breaks in our statewide network, our water main replacement program ensures we can proactively work to limit their frequency.” 

Lewry said that water mains have a lifespan of up to 100 years, and these new pipes will ensure SA Water can continue to deliver clean, safe drinking water to customers well into the future. 

“We will also ensure our customers are notified of any temporary water supply interruptions that are necessary when we move their connections over from the old to new pipes.”

Construction of the new main will take around four weeks, with works typically occurring Monday to Friday, between 7 am and 6 pm. 

For more information visit the SA Water website. 

desalination plant

SA Water’s new desalination plant

Following the inspection and analysis of 20 potential sites across Port Lincoln and Lower Eyre Peninsula, SA Water has selected Billy Lights Point as the new preferred location for a planned desalination plant. 

The plant will provide a reliable, climate-independent drinking water source to supplement existing groundwater supplies. 

It will prove critical to maintaining a long-term supply of safe, clean drinking water for 35,000 SA Water customers on the Eyre Peninsula. 

SA Water general manager of sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the Billy Lights Point location is suitable for the most effective delivery, while also maintaining the quality of the local environment. 

“With the support of independent experts, we looked at a range of criteria as part of the site review process, with environmental impacts given the highest weighting,” said Lewry. 

“Billy Lights Point best satisfies the criteria, providing reduced technical and environmental challenges; proximity to existing water and electricity networks; a larger available footprint to provide a buffer from residential areas; water quality improvements to Port Lincoln, and best value for money for our customers.” 

SA Water will progress detailed design assessments and hydrodynamic modelling to determine the exact location and length of the intake (where the plant draws seawater in) and outfall (where the plant disperses saline concentrate from the desalination process) pipes.

The plant will draw a total of up to 11.3 GL of water from the ocean each year, which is around 0.64 per cent of the volume of Boston and Proper Bay.

It will initially be designed to a four GL per year capacity, with marine and underground pipework designed to provide for an additional four GL per year, should it be required to support future drinking water demand.

Subject to required approvals, construction of the new desalination plant and supporting infrastructure is expected to begin mid next year, with first water to be delivered by the end of 2023.

For more information visit the SA Water website. 

Artist impression of the Torrens to Darlington project

Enabling works underway on T2D Project

The Torrens to Darlington (T2D) Project is a 10.5 km north-south corridor that will complete the 78 km non-stop connection between Gawler and Old Noarlunga.  

Jointly funded by the Australian and SA Governments, the project is estimated to reach $9.9 billion. 

Yesterday, the Premier of SA announced that works had started at the southern end of the project corridor around Clovelly Park.

Works included the relocation of SA Power Networks cabling to clear the way for the southern tunnel launch site, with more than $85 million in crucial enabling works now underway. 

Federal Minister for Communications, Urban Infrastructure, Cities and The Arts Paul Fletcher said these early enabling works would help the project commence smoothly to its construction phase. 

“The Morrison Government has invested billions in the North-South Corridor – the most significant infrastructure project ever undertaken in the state – as part of its record $110 billion infrastructure investment pipeline, which is helping to drive the nation’s world-leading economic recovery,” he said.

The SA Government said a hybrid option would be used to deliver the project, using a combination of tunnels, lowered and ground-level motorways, as well as overpasses and underpasses at key intersections. 

Stage One, which is construction of the Southern Tunnel between Anzac Highway and Darlington, will including more than 4 km of tunnel. 

Stage Two, which will be the Airport Link and Northern Tunnel between the River Torrens and Anzac Highway, will include a second tunnel and at-surface motorway.

When complete, around 60 per cent of the T2D Project will be comprised of underground tunnels.

SA Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Corey Wingard said getting the initial works done early will help ensure T2D remains on track for first stages of tunnelling in 2023. 

Minister Wingard said the T2D project will support more than 4,500 jobs and underpin the state’s construction industry for the next decade, delivering an economic boost for the community.  

The North-South Corridor is expected to be completed in 2030. 

For more information visit the Premier of South Australia’s website. 

SA Water installs new Murray Bridge water main

New water mains for regional SA

Works are scheduled to take place in major regional hubs including Gawler, Loxton, Port Lincoln and Port Pirie. 

All will receive a share of around 47,000 m in new water main, set to be installed over the next 12 months. 

SA Water General Manager of Sustainable Infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the program builds on the 31,000 m of water main upgraded across regional areas during 2020-21.

“Improving our services isn’t just about delivering good quality drinking water, it’s about maintaining the system that delivers it, to reduce the frequency of water main leaks and breaks and their potential impact on our customers,” she said. 

“Through smart investment, these ongoing improvements to your regional water network will help sustain the infrastructure’s long-term reliability.” 

Works will include replacing reticulated water mains as well as upgrades to larger pipelines and treatment plants. 

Ms Lewry said the water main upgrades across regional areas will ensure local residents and businesses can continue to access their water services, sustaining wellbeing and economic growth. 

She added that SA Water is looking forward to working with its construction partners do deliver an investment that secures the prosperity of communities in South Australia. 

For more information visit the SA Water website. 

$90m allocated for SA water infrastructure

The Premier of South Australia announced last Friday that a stimulus package of nearly $90 million would be dedicated to delivering a range of water services to the state.

The projects will range from delivering additional water to Barossa Valley wine producers, to supplying high-tech glass houses in Virginia.

The projects will be jointly funded by the Marshall Liberal Government, the Commonwealth, and partners under the National Water Grid Fund.

Minister for Primary Industries and Regional Development David Basham said the projects will provide a significant boost to South Australia’s agricultural industry.

Premier Marshall said these 10 projects across the state will grow jobs by delivering new and affordable water, enhancing water security and stimulating regional development.

“These projects will both support existing primary industries and allow for new and expanded agriculture to be undertaken in some of South Australia’s most important agricultural areas,” he said.

The delivery of the projects, including the installation of new infrastructure, is estimated to support around 800 jobs.

For a full list of the projects, including the new Nairne recycled water pipeline ($1.29 million) and the Barossa grape water source diversification ($9 million) projects, visit the South Australian Government website.