Virus can’t stop Interflow

During COVID-19, some infrastructure projects – like the critical wastewater project at Moa Point in Wellington – were deemed so critical to the health and wellbeing of the local community that they could not wait. To complete the difficult project during the pandemic and against all odds, Interflow had to challenge the status quo and push the limits of traditional water infrastructure methods.

NZ’s largest water infrastructure project

Beneath the coastal streets of Moa Point lies one of Wellington’s most critical sewer pipelines that manages wastewater for more than 200,000 residents. Recently, the pipeline was experiencing severe corrosion and was at risk of collapse, with the deterioration having reached the steel reinforcement of the pipeline – even penetrating the pipeline in places – posing a threat to the network, community and environment.

As an operator, Wellington Water understood the health and longevity of the sewer was a top priority and it publicly tendered the rehabilitation works. The tender sought an innovative yet cost-effective solution that would prioritise the needs of the community and minimise disruption to residents.

Being renowned in the industry for its appetite for innovation and commitment to solving its customers’ problems, Interflow was awarded the project. As the Moa Point wastewater rehabilitation would become the largest dimeter sewer pipeline renewal project to take place on New Zealand’s shores, Interflow says it tackled the challenge head on.


Due to COVID-19 restrictions, all site personnel were required to wear PPE equipment such as face masks.

COVID-19 challenges local project

Although the contract was awarded in late February, the 260 m reline of Wellington’s main sewer could not commence until April, causing crews to quickly learn the importance of adaptability and agility with the coronavirus emergency in NZ.

While the country’s lockdown regulations have been some of the strictest in the world, Interflow was classified as an essential service meaning the wastewater network’s critical repairs could continue, albeit with a few workflow adjustments.

Interflow Project Engineer Saadia Ali says there were many challenges the crew overcame to ensure the project was kept on schedule.

“The expectation that our colleagues from Australia would fly out and provide support was no longer a reality and required us to employ some unconventional approaches,” she says.

Despite expecting assistance from Australian counterparts and training from experienced Rotaloc staff, once travel restrictions were put in place by both the Australian and NZ governments, Interflow’s crews were required to turn to virtual channels to bridge the training gap.

Tenacity and determination yields results

Ms Ali says using digital technologies enabled the crew to develop the necessary skills needed to deliver these works.

“The solution was a remote Rotaloc training session held via video link to bring our team up to speed on the patented technology’s application and operations,” says Ms Ali.

The Rotaloc installation of a new liner into the pipe provides a durable, long-term solution to protect Wellington’s wastewater interceptor from corrosion and support the needs of the community for at least another 50 years.

“Our team worked extremely hard to overcome the challenges faced due to the pandemic,” says Ms Ali.

“We were working away from our families in an ‘Interflow bubble’ and had to rethink the way we collaborated with our customers, contractors and the broader community.”

Commitment to the community

Through collaboration and forward thinking, Wellington Water and Interflow rebuilt the city’s critical wastewater link before any significant harmful effects impacted the city. With works now completed, Wellington’s residents can relax knowing the wastewater network and services to homes, local businesses and the community are back to being fully operational.

Interflow says its flexibility during the pandemic allowed the company to tackle the challenges of COVID-19 head on and deliver the project successfully.

“The virtual training and collaboration that took place during this project demonstrate the company’s innovative approach to problem solving,” says Interflow.

“Furthermore, the solution is now incorporated into the NZ team’s service offering moving forward, enhancing their ability to respond to challenges of this type in the future.”

This article was featured in the September 2020 edition of Trenchless Australasia. To view the magazine on your PC, Mac, tablet or mobile device, click here.

For more information visit the Interflow website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Assistant Editor Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

Relining SIG gets reformed

In 2016, the Linings SIG was formed to develop standard specifications that all asset owners in Australia and New Zealand could use with confidence.

After limited success at the time, the ASTT is now proposing to resurrect the group that at this stage will be chaired by New Zealand Councillor Blair Telfer.

The group intends to develop training courses and material for pipe lining, similar to the North American Society for Trenchless Technology (NASTT) courses but instead with an Australasian perspective.

ASTT Secretary Jeff Pace said the SIG is always open to other suggestions and ideas from individuals and companies as to what the industry needs and wants.

To register your interest for the SIG, please contact jeffpace@astt.com.au

For more information visit the ASTT website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia Assistant Editor Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

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Central Coast rehabs sewer network

Sewer mains in 45 Central Coast suburbs have been rehabilitated in the past financial year to improve the performance and reliability of the networking by extending the infrastructure’s life by up to 50 years.

Central Coast Council Director Water and Sewer Jamie Loader said the maintenance program, using “innovative technologies”, has improved reliability, lowered the risk of environmental disruption and ensured the region is well positioned to cater for future population growth.

“We have an ongoing maintenance program for our extensive 2,649 km sewer network and our focus is on rehabilitating damaged sewer pipelines or replacing end-of-design-life equipment,” said Mr Loader.

“We’re using an innovative technique to rehabilitate damaged sewer pipelines with structural re-lining, rather than replacing the infrastructure, and we start by clearing the pipe and assessing the conditions of sewer lines via CCTV camera.

“If required, we insert a liner that reinforces the existing pipe structure, sealing any leaks and significantly reduces the risk of future damage – particularly from tree roots, the number one cause of sewer blocks and overflows.

“This technique also eliminates the need to excavate in most cases, which minimises disruption to the community and reduces repair costs.”

This investment in critical infrastructure will now ease the pressure on the network for the growing population and enhance the liveability for residents, Mayor Lisa Matthews said.

The Central Coast Council has actively monitored and tested the effectiveness of its sewer mains network across the region to indicate areas due for maintenance, which it will continue to do following this rehabilitation program.

For more information visit the Central Coast Council website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

View the latest trenchless technology tenders

View the latest trenchless technology tenders

PNCC Wastewater Pipe Relining and Rehabilitation 2020–22
Issued by:
Palmerston North City Council
Closing date:
7 July 2020
Location:
New Zealand
Description
: PNCC are seeking tenders from suitable, qualified and experienced contractors for the relining and rehabilitation of the PNCC wastewater network, and in some cases including laterals on private property. This contract covers larger mains, ranging from 750 mm diameter down to 300 mm diameter. As well as relining of the mains, works also include pre and post CCTV inspections, epoxy coating of associated manholes and relining of associated laterals.

Construction of new sewage pump station R19A and renewal of sewage pump station SH1
Issued by: Cairns Regional Council
Closing date: 7 July 2020
Location: Queensland
Description: Cairns Regional Council is inviting submissions from suitably qualified and experienced contractors for the construction of new sewage pump station R19A at Portsmith and the renewal works at sewage pump station SH1 at Smithfield.

Mount Grey Road to Smarts Road Watermain
Issued by: Hurunui District Council
Closing date: 9 July 2020
Location: New Zealand
Description: The proposed project consists of approximately 3,000 m of DN 180 PE100 PN12, approximately 3,000 m of DN 63 PE80 PN12, approximately 385 m of DN 63 PE80 PN16, approximately 975 m of DN 32 PE80 PN12 and approximately 1,719 m of DN 25 PE80 PN12. There are several road crossings that will be installed by trenchless methods, the project also consists of SV valves, air-valves and connections. The contractor is to supply and install all the valves, fittings, small bore pipe and all pipe welding. Hurunui District Council will supply the DN 180 PE100 (15 m sticks) PN12.

Citywide trenchless technology rehabilitation works
Issued by: Newcastle City Council
Closing date: 14 July 2020
Location: New South Wales
Description: The provision of asset rehabilitation works to existing underground stormwater conduits using trenchless lining technology at various locations across the Newcastle Local Government Area.

Warren – Blackwood Regional Water Supply Scheme – Greenbushes to Kirup Link
Issued by:
Barwon Water
Closing Date:
23 July 2020
Location:
Western Australia
Description
: Water Corporation is inviting organisations with suitable experience, capability and capacity to submit a bid for the manufacture, supply, construction, installation, testing and commissioning of approximately 17 km DN 150 MPVC pipeline, tank site reconfigurations and new infrastructure to suit the new water supply scheme, road access, electrical and controls upgrades from Greenbushes to Kirup.

Each fortnightly edition of the Trenchless Australasia e-newsletter includes a list of tenders relevant to no-dig contractors, suppliers and manufacturers.

The information is provided by Australian Tenders, which is renowned for being an Australia-wide locally owned and operated tender notification service.

Australian Tenders is also offering readers of Trenchless Australasia an extra three months on their subscription plans.

Email support@australiantenders.com.au for more information.

For more tender information visit the Australian Tenders website.

If you have a tender you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

Regional reline project continues its success

The major sewer relining maintenance project is taking place underneath main roads in the southeast Queensland region, with most pipes being relined in the current program 50 to 70 years old with “at risk” conditions.

Currently in the second year of its two-year contract, the tender was released in 2018 through LG Tender Box with the Wide Bay Burnett Regional Organisation of Councils (WBBROC), which has six member councils.

Five of the six member councils participated in the second round of the relining program, enabling the bulk power of a larger organisation and reducing the financial impact on the community. Fraser Coast Regional Council managed the contract on behalf of all WBBROC members.

Trenchless wins for customer satisfaction

Bundaberg Regional Council Network Program Coordinator Water Services Branch Geoff Tansley says that since trenchless methods have a considerably lower impact on residents, property owners and other services, a much higher customer satisfaction is achieved compared to open excavation.

“Providing the buried asset has not deteriorated or collapsed to a point where a liner cannot be pulled through or it would burst due to sharp fragments and edges with the host pipe, relining existing pipes is more financially viable than excavation,” says Mr Tansley.

“As there is no excavation normally required, the process removes risks involved with working in excavations.”

Mr Tansley says any excavation of the region’s sewers – some being more than 6 m in depth – would be onerous, expensive and risky in addition to the significant reinstate effort that would be required. However, trenchless construction can mitigate these risks and result in overall lower operational costs.

Ultimately, Mr Tansley says the Bundaberg Regional Council chose a trenchless construction method due to customer relations and satisfaction, financial stability achieved through reduced delivery cost and on-going operational costs as well as a length design life.

More trenchless considerations

Although relining was chosen as the primary solution, the council also considered implementing the pipe bursting technique as a rehabilitation option for sewer mains that have partially collapsed and are preventing insertion of liners.

However, Mr Tansley says this process would end up requiring open excavation and modification to reinstate the connection, therefore pipe bursting was discounted as an option due to these requirements and additional costs.

“In these cases, the areas that had collapsed and were preventing the liner installation were excavated and patched sufficiently enough to enable renewal with either GRP or PVC liners,” says Mr Tansley.

Bundaberg Regional council has also used pipe jacking and line boring in previous works to install new sewers or upgrade existing mains, particularly under existing roads; however, this method has seen limited results in the past due to an inability to maintain gradient and pipes failing due to tension stress.

Reaping the rewards with minimal disruption

By implementing relining as the trenchless solution, the project can ensure the continuity of essential services to the Bundaberg region without significant impact on the asset’s delivery as it is being renewed.

If open excavation had been chosen, interruption to services such as sewer and road transport would expose workers to risks from buried services such as electrical cabling and gas mains while also creating a significant impact and disturbance on the environment.

“Sewer renewal through relining is financially sustainable, as it is often the most cost and time effective renewal method, especially for deep pipe and those with access constrains,” says Mr Tansley.

Utilising state-wide contractors

The large diameter sewers – those 375 mm in diameter and larger – are being relined using an iMPREG cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) system by AARO Group, a Perth based company with a depot located in Currumbin Waters.

The iMPREG liner system, which has a design life of 100 years, is an ultraviolet light cured glass fibre reinforced plastic (GRP) liner that is cured after being pulled in place and inflated using compressed air.

Mr Tansley says AARO Group has a crew of eight onsite undertaking the jet cleaning, CCTV and installation work. In addition to the relining workers, AARO Group also sourced a local traffic control company who are providing an additional four-person team to safely manage traffic and pedestrian guidance.

The smaller sewer mains, up to and including 300 mm, are being renewed by Queensland based company Relining Solutions and using an AM-LINER II, which is a continuous length of polyvinyl chloride pipe and has a design life of 50 years.

Once on site and after achieving the required heat soak period and pressure test, the steam supply is transitioned to compressed air and the steam is slowly purged while maintaining pressure to allow the liner to cool in place and become a new PVC pipe.

When the liner has achieved the required heat soak period and pressure test, the steam supply is transitioned to compressed air and the steam is slowly purged while maintaining pressure allowing the liner to cool in place becoming a new PVC pipe.

The AARO team uses new trenchless systems and technology to complete the council’s rehabilitation project.

Future plans

The current program was originally planned to be completed in May 2020, although it is now slightly behind its initial timeline due to issues with transportation of materials and equipment caused by COVID-19 health and safety measures.

Despite these delays, the Bundaberg Regional Council says new plans are already in place for future work.

“The next round of the WBBROC sewer relining program is expected to be a three-year tender and should be advertised later this year,” says Mr Tansley.

Mr Tansley says the council’s water services department has also established an associated program of proactive cleaning, survey and condition assessing for the region’s entire sewerage system to identify and quantify any defects in the network.

“The information gained from this survey will be used to identify, cost and establish a rolling program of relining work for the future.”

Mr Tansley says the council will continue to implement trenchless renewal methods.

“As trenchless renewal methods are constantly being developed and improved and we will continue to review the emerging technologies and modify existing one to suit our application.”

This article was featured in the June 2020 edition of Trenchless Australasia. To view the magazine on your PC, Mac, tablet or mobile device, click here.

For more information visit the Bundaberg Regional Council website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

Aussie Trenchless leaves no project in the trenches

Aussie Trenchless’ flagship – and most popular – product is a close fitting structural spiral ribbed PVC trenchless pipe lining system known as the SRP EXP. Used for circular sewer and storm water gravity mains, the method has seen an increased popularity both in Australasia and abroad thanks to its versatility and ease of use.

By installing SRP EXP, asset operators can extend the service life of sewer and stormwater systems by more than 50 years. The product is designed to fit standard size access chambers but is also ideal for tight spaces and locations with bad access.

As the installation process is unaffected by running infiltration and does not need bypass pumping, it is well suited to water applications, particularly as it also enhances the hydraulic characteristics of the rehabilitated asset. The product is available for asset profiles from DN 150 to DN 1200, with such range allowing it to become a standout product to the market.

Aussie Trenchless Director Chris Meredith says he has seen significant growth in the implementation of this trenchless solution all around the world and particularly here in Australia, where it has been implemented in several locations.

Using Aussie Trenchless’s spiral lining system helped prevent collapse of the existing pipe walls.

A standout product in action

Recently, the spiral lining system was used to rehabilitate corrugated steel stormwater pipes for the Tablelands Regional Council in Queensland at the Ravenshoe Project.

As the pipes – which were each 750 mm in diameter and 33 m long – were in what was described as a ‘horrific’ condition, the contractor decided the only feasible application was Aussie Trenchless’ spiral lining.

With other methodologies, the risk of collapsing the walls could possibly result in a need to dig up the road. As it was the only road providing residents access to their properties, this would have caused major concern and delay with the digging requiring in at least one week of work.

By implementing the Aussie Trenchless solution, the contractors completed a size for size rehabilitation that had minimal risk of collapsing the existing pipe walls. At the conclusion of the project, the contracted engineer was extremely pleased with the final result and signed it off with no hesitation.

Mr Meredith says this project is just one example of how customers are starting to take advantage of the product, with the company receiving lots of market feedback indicating it’s one of the most financially viable and efficient systems available.

“Like all efficient trenchless methods, the spiral lining system helps ensure the works’ aboveground footprint is minimised as much as possible, which includes the land and environment itself, as well as the day-to-day lives of the public in surrounding areas,” says Mr Meredith.

“Other systems need two separate winding machines to install a range of profile to suit pipes from DN 150 to DN 1200. SRP EXP has been designed with one winding machine that installs all sizes of expanding profile for pipes from DN 150 to DN 1200 meaning there is no need for multiple winding machines.”

More than a one-hit wonder

While the SRP EXE is at the forefront of Aussie Trenchless’ offerings to the market, the company’s Hot Sleeve Jacket is a product that remains popular among customers by inducing a speedy resign cure during patch and seal lining activities.

The Hot Sleeve is a tight-fitting heating jacket that is secured over a patch inflatable packer to reduce ambient cure period without reducing its life, with operators finding it saves up to 60 per cent in crew times.

Aussie Trenchless has also caught the industry’s attention with its Pipe Segment Technology (PST) – a man entry lining system using transparent polypropylene lining panels for the rehabilitation of gravity sewer mains.

Both easy to build and fast to implement, PST lining panels are made of polypropylene material which provides a smooth surface with excellent hydraulic performance characteristics.

This article was featured in the June 2020 edition of Trenchless Australasia. To view the magazine on your PC, Mac, tablet or mobile device, click here.

For more information visit the Aussie Trenchless website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

View the latest trenchless technology tenders

View the latest trenchless technology tenders

Deanside Village External Water Main
Issued by:
Western Water
Closing Date:
18 May 2020
Location:
Victoria
Description
: Supply and construction of 1.16 km of 300 mm diameter PVC water main along Neale Road, Deanside in Melton City Council area, west of Hopkins Road intersection.

Echuca Water Treatment Plant Upgrade – Design & Construction
Issued by:
Coliban Region Water Corporation
Closing date:
21 May 2020
Location:
Victoria
Description: Coliban Water invites expression of interest submissions for the design and construction of upgrade works at the Echuca Water Treatment Plant. The upgrade includes an additional 6.6 ML of clear water storages, a UV disinfection system, a new high lift pump station and the refurbishment of an existing pump station.

Stormwater and Sewer Relining Packages
Issued by:
Mackay Regional Council
Closing date:
26 May 2020
Location:
Queensland
Description
: Mackay Regional Council is seeking an experienced contractor or contractors for the structural relining of stormwater reinforced concrete pipes and insitu concrete box culverts, as well as the structural relining of sewer gravity mains including junction sealing using trenchless technology.

2020/2021 Regional Sewer Relining
Issued by:
FNQROC
Closing date:
1 June 2020
Location:
Queensland
Description:
2020/2021 regional sewer relining and/or sewer and manhole condition assessments.

Each fortnightly edition of the Trenchless Australasia e-newsletter includes a list of tenders relevant to no-dig contractors, suppliers and manufacturers.

The information is provided by Australian Tenders, which is renowned for being an Australia-wide locally owned and operated tender notification service.

Australian Tenders is also offering readers of Trenchless Australasia an extra three months on their subscription plans.

Email support@australiantenders.com.au for more information.

For more tender information visit the Australian Tenders website.

If you have a tender you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

View the latest trenchless technology tenders

View the latest trenchless technology tenders

Water Main Renewal Program 2020
Issued by:
Hilltops Shire Council
Closing date:
30 April 2020
Location:
New South Wales
Description: Hilltops Council invites submissions from suitability qualified and experienced parties to undertake the design, supply and installation or construction of all works required to upgrade a number of water mains in Young, NSW. The town of Young is situated approximately 150 km northwest of Canberra, in the local government area of Hilltops Council. The council intends to renew various water mains within the town of Young, as the existing infrastructure is showing signs of distress and deterioration including depressions, cracked surfaces and water main breaks.

Pipeline maintenance works
Issued by:
City of Onkaparinga
Closing date:
6 May 2020
Location:
South Australia
Description
: Pipelines maintenance or management services required. Types of the services that may be required under this contract are: CCTV inspection and report – tractor unit, CCTV inspection and report – push rod unit, jet blasting, vacuum unit , service locations including mark up, potholing, hydro excavation, root treatment, combination Jetvac recycling unit, stormwater dewatering, stormwater relining and more.

Sewer manhole rehabilitation
Issued by: Winton Shire Council
Closing date:
6 May 2020 
Location:
Queensland
Description:
Winton Shire Council requires works for design and construct of Winton sewer manhole relining.

Stormwater Culvert Replacement Package FY19/20
Issued by:
Mackay Regional Council
Closing date:
12 May 2020
Location:
Queensland
Description: Mackay Regional Council is seeking to undertake the replacement and upgrade of various stormwater culvert structures at seven sites located within the council boundaries.

Works for Construction of Stormwater Relining Program for 2020/21
Issued by:
Glenorchy City Council
Closing date:
13 May 2020
Location:
Tasmania
Description
: Council requires a suitably experienced and qualified contractor to perform rehabilitation of stormwater circular pipework by relining. This work may be required to protect the internal surfaces from deterioration, restore structural integrity and/or hydraulic capacity, or prevent infiltration of groundwater and exfiltration of stormwater.

Eurobodalla Southern Storage – Tuross River Intake Pump Station
Issued by:
Public Works Advisory
Closing date:
14May 2020
Location:
New South Wales
Description: Construction of a new river intake pump station and associated pipelines and access works.

Each fortnightly edition of the Trenchless Australasia e-newsletter includes a list of tenders relevant to no-dig contractors, suppliers and manufacturers.

The information is provided by Australian Tenders, which is renowned for being an Australia-wide locally owned and operated tender notification service.

Australian Tenders is also offering readers of Trenchless Australasia an extra three months on their subscription plans.

Email support@australiantenders.com.au for more information.

For more tender information visit the Australian Tenders website.

If you have a tender you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

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WATCH: Bundaberg sewer relining project

The Bundaberg Regional Council Network Program Coordinator Geoff Tansley said the program was focusing on older and “at risk” sewer pipes.

“The most risk and consequence are normally associated with large high flow sewer mains and locations near roads, rivers, creeks or stormwater,” said Mr Tansley.

“Most of the sewer mains being relined in the current program are between 50 to 70 years old.”

Work will continue over the next few months, but Mr Tansley ensures residents will be mostly unaffected from what is happening underground.

“As the [relining] process happens from within, it eliminates the need to interrupt the service and has little impact or interference with traffic and residences,” he said.

“Those residents who have a sewer chamber within their yard will have a letter delivered and a worker will also speak to them to discuss the work and individual impact.

“Other residents within the work area will only have a notice delivered to property to explain the work and the expected timing.”

The current program is expected to be completed by the end of May 2020, yet the council said plans are already in place for future work.

“Water Services has established an associated program of proactive cleaning, survey and condition assessing our entire sewerage system to identify and quantify any defects in the network,” said Mr Tansley.

“The information gained from this survey will be used to identify, cost and establish a rolling program of relining work for the future.”

For more information visit the Bundaberg Regional Council website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

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Melbourne Water completes sewer upgrade early

The $35 million project saw a 7.2 km stretch of the sewer upgraded to ensure surrounding residents continue to receive a secure and reliable sewerage service.

The works included relining the inside of the existing sewer with new plastic sleeving, rehabilitating more than 70 ageing and damaged manholes and decommissioning others that were no longer needed.

Following the upgrade, the main sewer now transports about 24 million l of wastewater each day to the Western Treatment Plant.

Melbourne Water Project Manager Tom Ryan praised the project’s delivery partners CPB and the Black and Veatch joint venture for the ability to complete the works before the deadline.

“We did this by having a number of crews working in multiple locations at the same time, which allowed us to complete the works more quickly and efficiently,” he said.

By using trenchless technology, the important cultural and environmental values of the local area were protected.

Melbourne Water worked closely with other agencies on the project including Moonee Valley City Council, Parks Victoria, Wurundjeri Land Council, Friends of Maribyrnong Valley and Friends of Steele Creek.

“We could not have completed this important sewer upgrade without these strong partnerships,” said Mr Ryan.

Mr Ryan said the focus of the project was now on reinstating areas affected by the work activities, in accordance with plans approved by Council and Parks Victoria.

Melbourne Water staff will continue to deliver vital projects while adhering to the latest State Government health measures during the COVID-19 pandemic.

For more information visit the Melbourne Water website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

Aussie Trenchless protects stormwater culverts

Aussie Trenchless on top down under

Aussie Trenchless’ most popular product is a close fitting structural spiral ribbed PVC trenchless pipe lining system known as the SRP EXP. Used for circular sewer and storm water gravity mains, the method has seen an increase in popularity both in Australasia and abroad thanks to its versatility and ease of use.

SRP EXP can be fitted to both standard size access chambers as well as tight spaces with bad access, with the product available for asset profiles from DN 150 to DN 1200. It enhances the hydraulic characteristics of the rehabilitated asset, making it particularly well suited to water applications, while the installation process is unaffected by running infiltration and does not need bypass pumping.

Recently, the spiral lining system was called upon to rehabilitate two corrugated steel stormwater pipes for the Tablelands Regional Council in Queensland, known as the Ravenshoe Project. The pipes were each 750 mm in diameter and 33 m long and while other contractors were approached to rehabilitate the pipes, only Relining Solutions wanted to attempt a project of this calibre.

The pipes were in what could only be described as horrific condition and basically had no base left after rusting away over the years. The only feasible application was Aussie Trenchless’ spiral lining, as this would be a size for size rehabilitation and would have minimal risk of collapsing the existing pipe walls.

With other methodologies the risk of collapsing the walls would be very real, which would possibly result in a need to dig up the road. Being the only road giving the residents access to their properties, this would have been a major concern as digging would be a minimum of one week construction and disruption.

Relining Solutions used the 600 cage and Profile E20 for the application and the contracted engineer was very pleased with the final result and signed off the project with no hesitation.

The corrugated steel pipes at the Ravenshoe project were in terrible condition.

More in the arsenal

While the SRP EXE is at the forefront of Aussie Trenchless’ offerings to the market, the company’s Hot Sleeve Jacket is a product that remains popular among customers. The Hot Sleeve induces a speedy resin cure during patch and seal lining activities which operators are finding can save up to 60 per cent in crew times.

Aussie Trenchless has impressed the market with its Pipe Segment Technology (PST) and its Hot Sleeve Heating Jacket. PST is a man entry lining system using transparent polypropylene lining panels for the rehabilitation of gravity sewer mains.

The Hot Sleeve is used by Aussie Trenchless customers to induce a speedy resin cure during patch and seal lining activities. Estimated to save up to 60 per cent in crew times, the Hot Sleeve is a tight-fitting heating jacket that is secured over a patch inflatable packer to reduce ambient cure period without reducing its life.

Aussie Trenchless has also caught the industry’s attention with its Pipe Segment Technology (PST) – a man entry lining system using transparent polypropylene lining panels for the rehabilitation of gravity sewer mains. Easy to build and fast to implement, PST lining panels are made of polypropylene material which provides a smooth surface with excellent hydraulic performance characteristics.

For more information visit the Aussie Trenchless website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Journalist Sophie Venz at svenz@gs-press.com.au

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Melbourne Water completes sewer relining

In January, Melbourne Water announced an AU$100 million sewer relining and manhole rehabilitation program comprising six different projects.

Included in the program was the Pascoe Vale Sewer Upgrade that has now been finalised through the relining of the sewer and rehabilitation of the maintenance holes located throughout Pascoe Vale and Strathmore.

Melbourne Water constructed 500 m of sewerage bypass pumping pipeline; cleaned 400 m of the sewer, removing all debris and sludge; relined and grouted more than 385 m of sewer which was in poor condition due to deterioration; and rehabilitated 16 manholes.

Reinstatement works within the area will now commence.

For more information visit the Melbourne Water website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

Major sewer renewal for Bendigo

Coliban Water has commenced a major renewal project in Bendigo, Victoria using a trenchless technique that eliminates the need for contractors to excavate.

Coliban Water Manager Infrastructure Corey Bourne said the works on High Street, Creek Street North and Short Street will improve sewer service reliability.

“Our contractor, Interflow, will work at night so we can minimise impact to customers, business and traffic during the works period,” said Mr Bourne.

Interflow will reline the pipe with a spiral wound polyvinyl chloride (PVC) liner that restores the structural integrity and reliability of the sewer main, while also reducing the environmental and social impacts.

“The ongoing renewal of sewer mains across our region is an integral part of our operations to ensure we maintain and deliver services to customers,” said Mr Bourne.

“We inspect sewer mains by feeding through a CCTV camera.

“The footage is then reviewed to identify sections of the main that have been damaged and need to be renewed.”

The project began on 6 November and is due to be completed by the end of the month.

For more information visit the Coliban Water website.

If you have project news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

Interflow completes “impossible” project

The 100-year-old wastewater asset required an urgent excavation, repair and relining to nine broken junctions buried 5 m below ground while nestled in a confined 5.5 m wide alleyway and popular Lismore tourist attraction, Larkin Lane.

As the laneway is flanked by two-storey buildings, the proximity of infrastructure meant that any additional load around the buildings would be imposed on the pipe through surrounding soil.

Interflow Project Manager John Adamo said this affected the excavation plan to access the collapsed junctions as the buildings’ weight would directly impact the walls of the trench.

“The pipeline also had high flow in the main and house service lines, making excavation especially difficult,” said Mr Adamo.

A geographical report of the area determined Interflow’s need to install a custom designed steel casing tube to stabilise the working area and provide a robust solution due to its ‘hoop strength’.

“Our steel casing design was strong enough to resist the ground pressure from the soil and withstand any weight imposed on the trench from the surrounding infrastructure,” said Mr Adamo.

As the confined area would not allow for a large excavator, Interflow used a 6 t excavator to lift each section of the 1,800 mm diameter casing into the ground and bolt them together.

The project also faced some challenging conditions including extremely muddy and unstable work areas, as well as coping with heavy pedestrian foot traffic.

“Deep excavation was needed in slippery back mud – it is a very sticky, wet and heavy clay and this type of ground collapses easily,” said Mr Adamo.

To ensure minimal disruption and mitigate the risk of injuries, safety management and community relations remained at the forefront of the project.

For more information visit the Interflow website.  

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Chloe Jenkins to discuss promotional opportunities at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

Primus Line completes unique rehabilitation

The North Head Wastewater Treatment Plant comprises many tunnels and subterranean chambers that are located up to 100 m below the surface of the Sydney Harbour National Park, including a DN 150 sump pump pipeline that required rehabilitation due to a number of leakage points.

Along with several other pipelines, this pipe runs through a narrow and vertical shaft, which is only accessible by cramped ladders and makes pipeline replacement a time consuming and complicated process.

Instead, Sydney Water decided to reline the existing main with Primus Line’s deemed-to-comply technology, which has already proven itself in other Sydney Water projects.

The rehabilitation occurred in two sections, at 91 m and 15 m, after the pipe was drained and small pipe cut outs were created to grant access to the main.

The DN 150 PN 25 Primus Liner had a 1,400 mm diameter and was fed into the pipeline from top to bottom, secured through the entire installation process by ropes and lashing straps.

Upon inflating the pre-folder liner with compressed air, flange adapters and Primus Line PN 16 end fittings were installed, completing the rehabilitation process.

Sydney Water assigned the rehabilitation process to Primus Line’s local partner company Interflow.

Works were completed within two days.

For more information visit the Primus Line website.

If you have project news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

WSAA Roadshow Series approaching fast

The series will take place throughout October and November in five capital cities around the country and is free to attend to those in the water industry such as utilities, consultants, contractors and manufacturers.

WSAA, with funding and support from the CRC Program and more than 30 other partners, including the ASTT, will provide the update including covering how to reduce impact on customers and the environment, reduce the cost of reinstatement and provide an alternative asbestos cement pipe rehabilitation program.

The Smart Linings for Pipe and Infrastructure Project consists of conducting research on linings for water pipes and sewer pipes, developing codes of practice and product standards and developing tools to assist utilities in selecting suitable pipes for lining.

The event will take place in Melbourne on the 15 October; Brisbane on the 16 October; Sydney on the 17 Oct; Adelaide on the 29 October and Perth on the 4 November.

While attendance is free, attendees must pre-register for catering purposes.

For more information visit the WSAA website.

If you have news you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

Innovative technology used in sewer renewal project

Interflow recently completed a sewer renewal project for Coliban Water, located along View Street in Bendigo’s CBD which is subject to high volumes of pedestrian traffic.

On initial inspection, the extent of the existing damage meant that a large section of the sewer required replacing via open trenching prior to relining.

Any excavation to the site would undermine the integrity of the support columns of a nearby heritage listed balcony structure, meaning significant structural support was required at considerable cost.

To remain economical, a temporary propping system was designed to ensure there was no risk of foundation movement or settlement of the site during and after works.

As an overall solution, the damaged section of the pipe was repaired and the sewer relining was completed by using SPR™ EX – Expanda spiral wound liner that did not impose any risk to the support structure of the nearby balcony.

Interflow used stabilised sand for backfill material to ensure there was no subsidence post-completion, as well as a vacuum truck for hydro excavation due to the vicinity’s existing underground services and the restricted space available.

The work was completed without incident and within a week, which is significantly faster than using a dig-lay-backfill method.

For more information visit the Interflow website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

Convince your boss of the benefits of No-Dig Down Under!

These key facts will convince your boss that you need to attend one of Australia and New Zealand’s most important infrastructure events.

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2022 No-Dig Down Under to feature three-stream conference program

These five reasons make No-Dig Down Under an unmissable event

In its almost 20-year history, No-Dig Down Under has grown to become one of the most important, and largest, trenchless technology events in the world.

Taking place in Melbourne on 10–13 September, the event – supported by ASTT – will feature, a world-class conference program, the largest trade exhibition in the event’s history and training courses presented by international experts.

These five reasons make No-Dig Down Under standout as an unmissable trenchless event and as important as any no-dig event anywhere in the world.

1) Learn about how leading utilities are using no-dig methods in the conference

Asset owners play a vital role in the application of trenchless technology, which is why more than 40 per cent of the conference program consists of Australia and New Zealand’s leading utilities, operators and municipalities, including Sydney Water, Yarra Valley Water, Watercare, APA Group, Tas Gas Networks and Dial Before You Dig, as well as leading contractors such as John Holland, McConnell Dowell, Interflow and HDI Lucas.

The conference program, which was assembled from more than 130 paper submissions, also includes presentations on research and education into trenchless technologies from organisations such as the Water Services Association of Australia, Monash University and the University of Auckland.

Secure your attendance at the conference by registering today via the No-Dig Down Under website.

2) See the latest products in action in the exhibition hall

The exhibition will feature more than 100 of the world’s leading suppliers, manufacturers and service providers of the latest trenchless solutions for the installation, rehabilitation and location of underground infrastructure assets.

Many of these companies will be presenting practical demonstrations of their equipment, which is an important opportunity to see these products in action.

Make sure you set aside some time to walk through the giant hall (it might take you a while!) and grab a copy of the September edition of Trenchless Australasia for a guide on who to visit.

3) Celebrate the success of the industry at the Gala Dinner and Awards Evening

Arguably the most prestigious night on the trenchless calendar, this formal black tie event – sponsored by National Environmental Equipment (NATEE) – features the presentation of the biennial ASTT Awards, recognising and celebrating the achievements of the Australasian trenchless industry.

In total, five awards will be presented, honouring the rehabilitation and installation projects of the year; new technology; young person of the year; and person of the year.

Full conference registrations include access to the function, taking place on Thursday 12 September; otherwise, tickets can be purchased individually or as a table of 10.

4) Take advantage of invaluable networking opportunities at the social functions

In addition to the gala dinner, No-Dig Down Under will feature two more social functions, providing networking opportunities in a relaxed atmosphere.

On the evening of Tuesday 10 September, the exhibition will officially open with a ceremony, sponsored by Vermeer, with drinks and appetisers in the hall.

The opening is an opportunity to get a first glimpse of the exhibition hall and speak to exhibitors about their products and services before the general public the following morning.

Taking place the next evening, Wednesday 11 September, the Networking Reception – also sponsored by Vermeer – will be hosted on the bank of Melbourne’s famous Yarra River, opposite the city’s CBD, the reception is an opportunity to rub shoulders with the leaders of Australia and New Zealand’s trenchless industry.

Not only will the function feature great food, drinks and entertainment, but also a whiskey bar for those who are that way inclined.

5) Increase your trenchless knowledge by attending a training course

Originally developed by the North American Society for Trenchless Technology (NASTT), ASTT licensed the training courses and adapted them for Australasian audiences.

They are internationally recognised as the pinnacle of trenchless education and training, and offer an opportunity to be taught by global experts on the latest techniques and best practice.

In 2019, three courses will be presented: Cured-in-place pipe (CIPP) Good Practices Course, Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) Good Practices Guidelines Course, New Installation Methods Good Practices Course.

If you are interested in registering for the training courses, contact conferences@gs-press.com.au or visit www.nodigdownunder.com.au

Organised by Great Southern Press, the publisher of Trenchless Australasia, No-Dig Down Under is made possible by the generous support of Platinum Sponsor National Environmental Equipment (NATEE); Gold Sponsor Vermeer; Silver Sponsors KRE Engineering, Pezzimenti Trenchless and Vivax Metrotech; and Bronze Sponsors Interflow, Smart Lock and Ashapura.

The event is proud to raise funds and awareness for its Charity Partner WaterAid.

For more information visit the No-Dig Down Under website.

If you have a project you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Managing Editor Chloe Jenkins at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

Australasian Trenchless Directory now online

The online directory, which was also distributed earlier in 2019 as a print publication, lists companies involved in the industry in alphabetical order, as well as in groups according to the products and services they offer.

The directory also includes important contact information for organisations such as utilities, municipalities and government departments.

Click here to access the online directory.

Listings in the directory are free and guaranteed for all ASTT members, as well as supporters of Trenchless Australasia magazine.

Companies who advertised in the directory have their listings highlighted with the addition of a company logo as well a description of the business.

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Interested in highlighting your company in the next directory?

The Australasian Trenchless Directory is updated on an annual basis to stay up-to-date with changes and developments in the industry.

To enhance your listing in the 2020 edition, including with the addition of a company logo and description, contact Great Southern Press Managing Editor Chloe Jenkins to discuss marketing opportunities at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au

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NSW conference to dissect future projects

The 11th Annual NSW Major Project Conference, taking placein Sydney, Australia on 17–18 September 2019, will highlight the region’s largest infrastructure projects and upgrades and will involve more than 25 speakers and policy makers from government and the private sectors discussing the industry.

The conference comes at a pivotal time for the state, with a record of investment of AU$89.7 billion leaving NSW expecting to have more major infrastructure projects on the cards than any other state in Australia.

There will be a range of quality presentations, including a update on the WestConnex project and an in-depth review of the Stormwater Management and Road Tunnel – or SMART – system, presenting and innovative solution to flooding and traffic congestion.

There will also be a panel discussion on the Urban Congestion Fund, which seeks to reduce congestion in urban locations and has been allocated an investment of AU$4 billion over the next decade.

The panel will include TTM Consulting Director Mel Fyfe, Urbis Transport Advisory Associate Director Neill Miller, Transport for NSW Manager Walking and Cycling Strategy Sara Stace.

For more information visit the NSW Major Projects Conference website.

If you have an event you would like featured in Trenchless Australasia contact Assistant Editor Chloe Jenkins to discuss promotional opportunities at cjenkins@gs-press.com.au