Woodside, SA

SA Water installs PVC mains for Woodside

The new pipe being laid beneath Tolmer Road is among 47,000 m of water mains being installed for SA Water customers across regional SouthAustralia over the next year. 

The new pipes are made from PVC, which is chemically inert, corrosion resistant and more resistant to soil movement compared to fibre cement. 

SA Water’s general manager of sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said that continued investment in water network upgrades is an important part of the utility’s water services for its customers. 

“Despite soil movement and other environmental factors being major contributing factors to leaks and breaks in our statewide network, our water main replacement program ensures we can proactively work  to limit their frequency,” said Lewry. 

“With water mains having a lifespan of up to 100 years, these new pipes ensure we can continue to deliver clean, safe drinking water to local customers well into the future.”

Construction will take around eight weeks to complete, and SA Water asks residents and road users to take note of localised traffic management procedures in place. 

For more information visit the SA Water website. 

SA Water installs new Murray Bridge water main

SA Water installs new Murray Bridge water main

SA Water plans to start installing a new water main as part of the utility’s $155 million four-year water main management program.

Laid beneath Brinkley Road, the new pipe is part of 47,000 m of water mains being installed in the ground for SA Water customers throughout regional South Australia.

SA Water’s General Manager of Sustainable Infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the new pipe is constructed from PVC, a more resistant material than fibro-cement.

“With water mains having a lifespan of up to 100 years, these new pipes ensure we can continue to deliver clean, safe drinking water to local customers well into the future,” Lewry said.

“Continuing to invest in upgrades to our water network, like here in Murray Bridge, is an important part of how we can deliver trusted water services for our customers,” Lewry said.

Lewry said the installation targets leaks and breaks.

“Despite soil movement and other environmental factors being major contributing factors to leaks and breaks in our state-wide network, our water main replacement program ensures we can proactively work to limit their frequency,” she said.

SA Water advises residents and road users to take note of localised traffic management whilst the installation is proceeding, Lewry added.

“We will also ensure our customers are notified of any temporary water supply interruptions that are necessary when we move their connections over from the old to new pipes,” she said.

Other installations in the $155 million program include the upgrade to the Redbanks water main, which was the first of the water mains to be installed.

Due to the new main’s length, construction will take around seven months to complete, with works typically occurring Monday to Friday between 7am and 6pm.

For more information visit the SA Water website.

SA water upgrades water pipe

Upgrade to Redbanks water main

The project is part of the state’s $155 million four-year water main management program.   

The new pipes laid beneath Verner Road will be the first of 47,000 m of water mains embedded into the ground, enabling SA Water customers to have access to water from regional South Australia.   

SA Water’s general manager of sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the new pipes will be made of PVC, a more resistant pipe material to soil movement, in contrasting to the previous pipes made from fibro-cement.  

“Continuing to invest in upgrades to our water network, like here in Redbanks, is an important part of how we can deliver trusted water services for our customers,” Lewry said.   

SA Water acknowledged that despite soil movement and other environmental factors being major contributing risks to leaks and breaks, the new water main replacement will be able to heavily limit frequency of disruptions.  

“With water mains having a lifespan of up to 100 years, these news pipes ensure we can continue to deliver clean, safe drinking water to local customers well into the future”, said Lewry.  

SA Water aims to complete all works within eight weeks, with construction likely taking place Monday to Friday between 7 am to 5 pm within Redbanks.  

“For the safety of our people and the local community, we ask residents and road users to please take not of localised traffic management in place while the works are underway,” Lewry said.  

“We will also ensure our customers are notified of any temporary water supply interruptions that are necessary when we move their connections over from old to new pipes.” 

For more information visit the SA Water website

SA Water installs new Murray Bridge water main

Port Pirie new water main

The pipe revitalisation is part of the utility’s four-year, $155 million water main management program to deliver reliable drinking water to South Australia. 

SA Water general manager for sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the main refresh will help maintain safe and clean water for local consumers for many years to come. 

“Improving our services isn’t just about delivering good quality drinking water – it’s also about maintaining the system that delivers it,” said Lewry. 

“Taking around five weeks to complete, the replacement in Port Pirie West will use PVC pipes which are known for their flexibility and resistance to ground movement.” 

PVC is known for its flexibility and resistance to ground movement, and the new pipes are expected to extend the life of the water main for another 100 years.

“We will […] ensure our customers are notified of any temporary water supply interruptions that are necessary when we move their connections over from the old to new pipes.”

Port Pirie is located on the east coast of the Spencer Gulf in South Australia. The mains will be installed along Federation Street, with works typically carried out Monday to Friday, between 7 am and 5 pm. 

For more information visit the SA Water website. 

Barossa, SA

SA Water lays new pipe for Gawler East

The new main, which is being laid beneath Barossa Avenue, is among 47,000 m of new pipe going in the ground for SA Water customers across regional South Australia over the next year. 

SA Water general manager for sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the new pipe is made from corrosion resistant PVC. 

“Continuing to invest in upgrades to our water network, like here in Gawler East, is an important part of how we can deliver trusted water services for our customers,” said Lewry. 

“Despite soil movement and other environmental factors being major contributing factors to leaks and breaks in our statewide network, our water main replacement program ensures we can proactively work to limit their frequency.” 

Lewry said that water mains have a lifespan of up to 100 years, and these new pipes will ensure SA Water can continue to deliver clean, safe drinking water to customers well into the future. 

“We will also ensure our customers are notified of any temporary water supply interruptions that are necessary when we move their connections over from the old to new pipes.”

Construction of the new main will take around four weeks, with works typically occurring Monday to Friday, between 7 am and 6 pm. 

For more information visit the SA Water website. 

desalination plant

SA Water’s new desalination plant

Following the inspection and analysis of 20 potential sites across Port Lincoln and Lower Eyre Peninsula, SA Water has selected Billy Lights Point as the new preferred location for a planned desalination plant. 

The plant will provide a reliable, climate-independent drinking water source to supplement existing groundwater supplies. 

It will prove critical to maintaining a long-term supply of safe, clean drinking water for 35,000 SA Water customers on the Eyre Peninsula. 

SA Water general manager of sustainable infrastructure Amanda Lewry said the Billy Lights Point location is suitable for the most effective delivery, while also maintaining the quality of the local environment. 

“With the support of independent experts, we looked at a range of criteria as part of the site review process, with environmental impacts given the highest weighting,” said Lewry. 

“Billy Lights Point best satisfies the criteria, providing reduced technical and environmental challenges; proximity to existing water and electricity networks; a larger available footprint to provide a buffer from residential areas; water quality improvements to Port Lincoln, and best value for money for our customers.” 

SA Water will progress detailed design assessments and hydrodynamic modelling to determine the exact location and length of the intake (where the plant draws seawater in) and outfall (where the plant disperses saline concentrate from the desalination process) pipes.

The plant will draw a total of up to 11.3 GL of water from the ocean each year, which is around 0.64 per cent of the volume of Boston and Proper Bay.

It will initially be designed to a four GL per year capacity, with marine and underground pipework designed to provide for an additional four GL per year, should it be required to support future drinking water demand.

Subject to required approvals, construction of the new desalination plant and supporting infrastructure is expected to begin mid next year, with first water to be delivered by the end of 2023.

For more information visit the SA Water website.